Bordeaux Wine Mixed - 6 Pack Value
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Bordeaux Wine Mixed - 6 Pack Value
Bordeaux Wine Mixed - 6 Pack Value
google
Bordeaux Wine Mixed - 6 Pack Value

Bordeaux Wine Mixed - 6 Pack Value

$271 $401
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This is Great……and Here’s Why!

Bordeaux is celebrated for producing some of the world's most esteemed red blends, characterized by their complexity, structure, and age-worthiness. This exclusive collection features a variety of Bordeaux wines, each bottle offers a unique expression of Bordeaux's diverse terroirs and winemaking traditions. Our Bordeaux Wine Mixed - 6 pack value provides the perfect opportunity to explore the iconic wines of this historic region. Ideal for sharing with friends and family or for stocking your cellar with premium Bordeaux selections, this 6-pack offers exceptional value and unparalleled taste experiences.

1 x Château Du Vieux Montpezat (Organic) 2016 ~ Bordeaux, France

Organic

Acclaimed owner of a St Emillion Grand Cru

Connoisseur ""Forward in character and crowd-pleasing in style, with the ability to age.""

Wine Enthusiast ""This lightly structured wine is all fruit. Its red berry flavors are already well integrated with the smoky tannins that form its core."" (2014 Vintage)

The Winemaker ""Aromas of cherries, cassis, blueberries, cedar, tobacco, cocoa, pencil, pepper, laurel, oregano and violet. Fleshy, juicy, velvety on the palate, dense fruit, delicately spicy, complex, very elegant and long-lasting. Aged for 12 months in 1/3 new oak barrels."" (2014 Vintage)

Roger Barlow ""There are very pleasant fruity, ripe plum and spice aromas on the nose that continue on the palate. This is a delicious wine with a generous palate, fine-grained tannins, a voluptuous structure and a long finish."" (2015 vintage)

70% Merlot and 30% Cabernet Franc

Jean-Francois Meynard and Christelle Gauthier produce wine from three different Bordeaux appellations, all close to the Dordogne River; Côtes de Castillon, Saint Emilion and Entre-Deux-Mers. The most famous estate being Château L’Etoile de Clotte, a Saint Emilion Grand Cru. Both of their families have roots in the region extending back to the 19th century. Located in Saint Magne De Castillon, Château Du Vieux Montpezat is a small 10 hectare property operated on the principles of organic agriculture.

Bordeaux's Côtes de Castillon appellation is a growing area with AOC status since 1989. The approximately 3000 hectares of vineyards border Saint-Émilion and Bergerac and has similar tasting wines which are less expensive than its famous neighbours.

Bordeaux, in the southwest of France, needs little introduction as one of the world's most famous, prestigious and prolific wine regions. Its three trump cards are diversity, quality and quantity. The majority of Bordeaux wines (nearly 90 per cent of production volume) are the dry, medium- and full-bodied red Bordeaux Blends that established its reputation. The finest (and most expensive) of these come from the great châteaux of the Haut-Médoc and the Right Bank appellations Saint-Émilion and Pomerol. The legendary reds are complemented by high-quality white wines, both dry styles (particularly from Pessac-Léognan) and the sweet, botrytized nectars of Sauternes.

A Bordeaux Blend is any combination of those grape varieties typically used to make the red wines of Bordeaux. Cabernet Sauvignon is widely accepted as a compulsory component of any Bordeaux Blend along with Merlot. In fact, the majority of Bordeaux Blend wines are often made exclusively from a blend of these two varieties. The remaining components are Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot and Malbec.

1 x Château La Justice (Organic) 2016 ~ Bordeaux, France

Organic

Le Devoir Newspaper ""Rather proudly adorned, without ostentation,...ample enough to be savoured, but also more restrained, flirting with suppleness and liveliness.""

John Hattersley ""A classic Bordeaux from the best vineyards overlooking the beautiful Dordogne. Made under Michel Rolland oenologist-extraordinaire's watchful eye. Generous black fruit with a hint of coffee, lots of energy and fine aromatics on the finish: it shows how once Fronsac enjoyed stature to rival Pomerol and St Emilion.""

The Winemaker ""Red and black fruits are very present with notes of wood and vanilla. On the palate, the wine reveals roundness and power. The finish is persistent and elegant. The Château La Justice benefits from the region's mild climate and limestone soils. It contains strong aromas of ripe raspberries, cassis and blackberries as well as hints of spices and vanilla, as well as very subtle wood notes.I t is as complex on the palate as on the nose, opens dense and concentrated, has an undeniable elegance and ends in a long, very soft finish. It is best to set aside an aromatic hard cheese, a Mediterranean vegetable dish or a strong beef steak.""

100% Merlot

Chateau La Justice is owned by the same owners as the historic, well-known estate, Château de la Dauphine. Both wineries are farmed organically which is still a rare accomplishment in Bordeaux. Winemaking in managed by highly regarded oenologist Michel Rolland. Both estate's are located in the Fronsac appellation which resides in the eastern part of the famous French wine-growing region of Bordeaux. The vineyards which are located around the banks of the Dordogne produce a large number of complex wines, all of which have their very own character.

Bordeaux, in the southwest of France, needs little introduction as one of the world's most famous, prestigious and prolific wine regions. Its three trump cards are diversity, quality and quantity. The majority of Bordeaux wines (nearly 90 percent of production volume) are the dry, medium- and full-bodied red Bordeaux Blends that established its reputation. The finest (and most expensive) of these come from the great châteaux of the Haut-Médoc and the Right Bank appellations Saint-Émilion and Pomerol. The legendary reds are complemented by high-quality white wines, both dry styles (particularly from Pessac-Léognan) and the sweet, botrytized nectars of Sauternes.

1 x Chateau Jean Voisin Les Coteaux, Saint-Emilion Grand Cru 2012 - Bordeaux , France

1 star - Guide Hachette des Vins (2017 vintage)
1 star - Guide Hachette des Vins (2019 vintage)
1 star - Guide Hachette des Vins (2011 vintage)

Wine Style “A very aromatic wine with a rich, full-bodied taste”

Vinalgros ""Brilliant color with raspberry reflections, expressive bouquet of red fruits and blackcurrant with hints of dried fruits. Beautifully full, the aromas in the mouth continue to unfold; from vanilla to toast and blackberry ...In the mouth, a velvety tannin.""

The winemaker ""Dense fruit, spicy, complex, muscular elegance, plump approaches and a very long finish. It shows a very nice nose with aromas of cherries, cassis, cedar, cocoa, coffee, pencil, bay leaf, thyme, pepper and violets.""Grapes are from vines which are 25 years old or more. We use no herbicides, and the grapes are hand-picked. Vinification is by traditional techniques, with 14-18 months in oak barrels (30% new barrels)""

60% Merlot, 40% Cabernet Franc

Chateau Jean Voisin was founded in 1583 and is a family run estate. Now owned by the Chassagnoux family, Chateau Jean Voisin has a reputation as an award winning winery. The prestigious Guide Hachette des Vins has awarded the estate stars over several vintages. Currently run by Xavier and Laurence Chassagnoux, the fifteen hectare vineyard is located on the Saint-Émilion plateau which is known for its exceptional terroirs. Neighbours include famous grands crus wineries such as Château Cheval Blanc, Château Figeac and Pétrus (Pomerol appellation).

Saint-Émilion is a key wine region in the Libournais district of Bordeaux, important in terms of both quality and quantity. Vineyards have been situated in the region since Roman times, and today the Saint-Émilion wine appellation is one of the most prolific in the Bordeaux region, producing more than 250,000hl of wine each vintage. It is also responsible for some of the most prestigious, long-lived and expensive wines in the world – Châteaux Cheval Blanc, Ausone, Angélus, Figeac and Pavie. Only red wine qualifies for the Saint-Émilion appellation; although a small amount of white wine is made within the appellation, but it must be labelled as Bordeaux Blanc.

Bordeaux, in the southwest of France, needs little introduction as one of the world's most famous, prestigious and prolific wine regions. Its three trump cards are diversity, quality and quantity. The majority of Bordeaux wines (nearly 90 percent of production volume) are the dry, medium- and full-bodied red Bordeaux Blends that established its reputation. The finest (and most expensive) of these come from the great châteaux of the Haut-Médoc and the Right Bank appellations Saint-Émilion and Pomerol. The legendary reds are complemented by high-quality white wines, both dry styles (particularly from Pessac-Léognan) and the sweet, botrytized nectars of Sauternes.

A Bordeaux Blend is any combination of those grape varieties typically used to make the red wines of Bordeaux. Cabernet Sauvignon is widely accepted as a compulsory component of any Bordeaux Blend along with Merlot. In fact, the majority of Bordeaux Blend wines are often made exclusively from a blend of these two varieties. The remaining components are Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot and Malbec.

1 x Chateau Les Chaumes Lalande-de-Pomerol (Organic) 2017 - Bordeaux, France

Organic

Awarded Chateau

Roger Barlow ""There is finesse to this smooth, supple Les Chaumes; it is a wonderful expression of plum and bramble fruits and the careful use of oak leads to a complex finish without oak flavours dominating the fruit.""

The Winemaker ""Fruity and floral. This wine has great finesse with an impressive expression of red and black fruits."" (2014 vintage)

A blend of 65% Merlot, 25% Cabernet Franc and 15% Cabernet Sauvignon, and is carefully oaked with only 10% new wood used each year.

Chateau Les Chaumes is a 3.5 hectare estate in Bordeaux located between two of the best appellations; Siaurac and Moncets. It has been owned for many generations by the Vigier family. Château Les Chaumes creates great organic wine, well known all around the world. The vineyard's terroir is mostly composed of clay-limestone soils. The best reds of the Château Les Chaumes winery are matured for 12 to 18 months and develop spices and vanilla notes. The wines are fruity and pleasant, reflecting the unique characteristics of the terroir.

Situated on the Right Bank of Bordeaux, Pomerol is dominated by small estates producing premium wines. Pomerol wines are rich, decadent reds, with notes of chocolate, dark cherry, plums and spice, soft tannins and elegance courtesy of the Merlot grape. The most lush—and expensive—wines come from a plateau of clay, gravel and iron, while lighter, more acidic wines come from the region's sandy soils. Approximately 80 percent of the region's plantings are Merlot, unlike other regions of Bordeaux where no one grape dominates so singularly; and one disadvantage is that bad weather can wreak havoc on an individual vintage.

Bordeaux is made up of many sub-regions that each have their own soil and climate. However, there are two major areas in Bordeaux, the Left Bank and the Right Bank. The names are derived from the location of each area to the left (west) and right (east) of the Gironde Estuary and Garonne River.

Unlike many other regions in France, where wines are made from single grape varieties, Bordeaux blends five major varieties in the production of its reds: Cabernet Sauvignon for structure and tanning, Merlot for softness and fleshy ripe fruit, Cabernet Franc for lightness in the body, aromatic finesse and peppery perfume, Malbec for flavor intensity, complexity and tannins, Petit Verdot which is used in small amounts for color adjustment and tannin.

A Bordeaux Blend is any combination of those grape varieties typically used to make the red wines of Bordeaux. Cabernet Sauvignon is widely accepted as a compulsory component of any Bordeaux Blend along with Merlot. In fact, the majority of Bordeaux Blend wines are often made exclusively from a blend of these two varieties. The remaining components are Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot, and Malbec.

1 x Chateau Marjosse Pierre Lurton Bordeaux Blanc 2020 - Bordeaux, France

91/100 James Suckling
91/100 Decanter
89-91/100 Robert Parker, The Wine Advocate
88-90/100 Anthocyanes - Yohan Castaing
15.5/20 Vinum Wine Magazine
14.5/20 La Revue du Vin de France

Owned by one of the world's most famous winemakers, Pierre Lurton - president of two of Bordeaux's best-known chateaux, the Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) owned Château Cheval Blanc and Château d’Yquem.

James Suckling ""Plenty of sliced-apple, peach and lemon character with a medium body, fresh acidity and a clean, vivid finish. Energetic and ready for the beach!""

Decanter ""Well placed and perky fruits, not overly high in acidities but instead given focus by slate texture and a point of bitterness on the finish. Bright fruits keep things mouthwatering. 3% Muscadelle completes the plantings (I don't have the specific 2020 blend). This is an enjoyable Bordeaux Blanc with personality; a successful wine in the category.""

Robert Parker, The Wine Advocate ""Comes skipping out of the glass with vibrant notes of lime leaves, grapefruit and crushed rocks, giving way to emerging notions of green apples, dill seed, and fresh hay. The medium-bodied palate delivers a great intensity of herbs-laced citrus flavors, supported by a racy backbone and finishing long and chalky.""

Vinum Wine Magazine ""Particularly refreshing and drinkable with its notes of acacia and mint, its slim but well-structured build, the noticeable minerality. Enjoy young...""

Château Marjosse is owned by French 'wine royalty', Pierre Lurton - president of two of Bordeaux’s best-known châteaux; the Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) owned, Château Cheval Blanc and Château d’Yquem, Château Marjosse. Pierre Lurton comes from two of the great Bordeaux families. His father Dominique was the youngest son of the paterfamilias François Lurton; his uncle André Lurton who founded the eponymous wine company; his many cousins run châteaux from Pauillac to Pomerol. His mother is from the famous Lafite family.

The influential Club Enologique asserts that Pierre is the most accomplished wine personality of his famous family. Trained as a doctor but swapping his studies for wine making after four years. At 23 he took over Clos Fourtet in St Emilion, one of the fine Lurton properties, and in 1991 he was appointed head of Château Cheval Blanc (it was bought by Bernard Arnault of LVMH in 1998); in 1999 he took on Château d’Yquem, which had just been added to the Arnault portfolio.

Club Enologique describes Pierre Lurton as having the world’s most corporate wine job. ""However he divides his time between two of the world’s most exalted wine properties, but comes down to earth in Entre-deux-Mers, the leafy, unpretentious appellation to the east of Bordeaux at Château Marjosse.""

The Château Marjosse estate is located in Entre-deux-Mers, on the right bank of Bordeaux. Initially owned by the wine merchant Bernard Chénier, Château Marjosse was acquired by the Deleuze family, who, in 1990, gave some plots to Pierre Lurton to rent. In 1992, Pierre Lurton, who grew up in Château Reynier, neighbour to this magnificent Chartreuse, moved to a second home in Château Marjosse and, over successive years became the owner of the entire vineyard, as well as the Chartreuse in 2013.

Decanter ""Since Lurton bought Château Marjosse in 1994, the estate has improved beyond recognition. Pierre's father, Dominique Lurton, also made over a further 30ha so that, under the Château Marjosse label, Lurton now exploits 42ha of vineyard, six hectares of white and 36ha of Bordeaux red – a total of 300,000 bottles a year. Pierre insists his wine is Bordeaux and not Bordeaux Supérieur because ‘my wine is only supérieur in the bottle’. His objectives are ambitious. As the quality of the terroir with clay-limestone soil is similar to some of the better areas in Saint-Emilion, he hopes to prove that wines from this area can rival those from more prestigious regions.""

Sommeliers International ""At Château Marjosse the land possesses yet another specific feature, known locally as “la Boulbène”, a silty-clayey texture that has developed on ancient alluvions. The fertility of these soils no longer needs to be proved, because, by chance, they are also found in Saint-Emilion, a terroir that is extremely familiar to the man who manages “Cheval Blanc” …. Pierre Lurton. Assisted in this transformation by Consultant-Oenologist Pascal Poussevin, whose recommendations range from vine growing to wine-making, Pierre Lurton’s estate has now reached its cruising speed … Beyond the fabulous adventures he experiences in his role as manager of Châteaux d’Yquem, Cheval Blanc, as well as estates in South Africa, Latin America and in Australia … it is undoubtedly with “the salt of this land here in the Entre-deux-Mers” that his years of quest for perfection will be revealed. It is clear that this region needs winegrowers of such calibre, those who possess a sixth sense and, using techniques that almost resemble intentional alchemy, transform the grapes they touch into wines that exude the unique character of a specific area.""

The Entre-deux-Mers region, nicknamed by wine experts as “Little Tuscany”, is unique and jealously protected by its inhabitants. ""There are fifteen appellations that constitute the Entre-deux-Mers. The most well-known of them all, reputed for its dry, lively white wines, is certainly the one which bears the name of this region! The Entre-deux-Mers cultivates a certain speciality in producing white wines, due to its basic geological assets, possessing gravelly-limestone soils, upon which Sémillon, Sauvignon, Muscadelle and even Ugni Blanc grape varieties are planted. But the variety of soils and sub-soils associated with such a complex landscape provides a diversity of terroirs … These are favourable for producing red wines, that are regrettably not sufficiently well-known, but highly prized for the complexity of their aromas, their deep, vivid colour, as well as the concentration and elegance of their tannins."" Sommeliers International.

Bordeaux, in the southwest of France, needs little introduction as one of the world's most famous, prestigious and prolific wine regions. Its three trump cards are diversity, quality and quantity. The majority of Bordeaux wines (nearly 90 percent of production volume) are the dry, medium- and full-bodied red Bordeaux Blends that established its reputation. The finest (and most expensive) of these come from the great châteaux of the Haut-Médoc and the Right Bank appellations Saint-Émilion and Pomerol. The legendary reds are complemented by high-quality white wines, both dry styles (particularly from Pessac-Léognan) and the sweet, botrytized nectars of Sauternes.

The Sauvignon Blanc taste is one of the most identifiable in the world of white wines for a few reasons. First, it always has crisp, high acidity. Second, it has a chemical compound called pyrazine which gives grassy, herbal or bell pepper flavors. When grown in cooler climates or picked early, the herbaceous green character is most prominent. In warmer climates or allowed to hang longer on the vine, the pyrazine character diminishes in favor of riper fruit flavors ranging from grapefruit, to passion fruit and guava.

1 x Chateau Marjosse Pierre Lurton Cuvee Palombre White 2020 - Bordeaux, France

92/100 James Suckiing
93/100 James Sucking (2019 vintage)
92/100 Jean Marc Quarin (2019 vintage)
90/100 Jeff Leve, The Wine Cellar Insider (2019 vintage)
16.5/20 Jancis Robinson (2019 vintage)

Owned by one of the world's most famous winemakers, Pierre Lurton - president of two of Bordeaux's best-known chateaux, the Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) owned Château Cheval Blanc and Château d’Yquem.

James Suckling, ''..I like the density and concentration, with a delicious creaminess undercut by herb and spice...Almonds, fennel, yoghurt, grapefruit and pear skins on the nose, with some cloves and white pepper.''

Jancis Robinson ""Cuvée Palombe, a startlingly rich white based on 45- to 70-year-old vines named after a pigeon. The blend is a third each of Sémillon, Sauvignon Blanc and the more perfumed Sauvignon Gris but seems to me to be dominated by the lovely beeswax and lanolin flavours of fully ripe Sémillon, a grape variety more often encountered in sweet white bordeaux. I originally tasted the wine at room temperature when it seemed almost fat, until a nice cooling breeze of Sauvignon Blanc blew across my palate on the finish. The wine benefited from being restored to the cellar before I tasted it a second time, when it was, again, such a welcome and characterful contrast to the technically perfect Sauvignon-dominated style that has become typical of Bordeaux Blanc."" (2019 vintage)


James Suckling ""..Focused and elegant...A medium-to full-bodied white with complex aromas of dried lime, apricot, green mango, flint and toast. It’s textured and creamy with crisp acidity and flinty, subtly smoky layers."" (2019 vintage)

Jeff Leve, The Wine Cellar Insider ""Flowers, lemon rind, spearmint and honeysuckle notes are all over the place. Fresh, forward, fruity and with a creamy, yellow, citrus rind finish, with just a drizzle of honey, you can enjoy this on release."" (2019 vintage)

Château Marjosse is owned by French 'wine royalty', Pierre Lurton - president of two of Bordeaux’s best-known châteaux; the Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) owned, Château Cheval Blanc and Château d’Yquem, Château Marjosse. Pierre Lurton comes from two of the great Bordeaux families. His father Dominique was the youngest son of the paterfamilias François Lurton; his uncle André Lurton who founded the eponymous wine company; his many cousins run châteaux from Pauillac to Pomerol. His mother is from the famous Lafite family.

The influential Club Enologique asserts that Pierre is the most accomplished wine personality of his famous family. Trained as a doctor but swapping his studies for wine making after four years. At 23 he took over Clos Fourtet in St Emilion, one of the fine Lurton properties, and in 1991 he was appointed head of Château Cheval Blanc (it was bought by Bernard Arnault of LVMH in 1998); in 1999 he took on Château d’Yquem, which had just been added to the Arnault portfolio.

Club Enologique describes Pierre Lurton as having the world’s most corporate wine job. ""However he divides his time between two of the world’s most exalted wine properties, but comes down to earth in Entre-deux-Mers, the leafy, unpretentious appellation to the east of Bordeaux at Château Marjosse.""

The Château Marjosse estate is located in Entre-deux-Mers, on the right bank of Bordeaux. Initially owned by the wine merchant Bernard Chénier, Château Marjosse was acquired by the Deleuze family, who, in 1990, gave some plots to Pierre Lurton to rent. In 1992, Pierre Lurton, who grew up in Château Reynier, neighbour to this magnificent Chartreuse, moved to a second home in Château Marjosse and, over successive years became the owner of the entire vineyard, as well as the Chartreuse in 2013.

Decanter ""Since Lurton bought Château Marjosse in 1994, the estate has improved beyond recognition. Pierre's father, Dominique Lurton, also made over a further 30ha so that, under the Château Marjosse label, Lurton now exploits 42ha of vineyard, six hectares of white and 36ha of Bordeaux red – a total of 300,000 bottles a year. Pierre insists his wine is Bordeaux and not Bordeaux Supérieur because ‘my wine is only supérieur in the bottle’. His objectives are ambitious. As the quality of the terroir with clay-limestone soil is similar to some of the better areas in Saint-Emilion, he hopes to prove that wines from this area can rival those from more prestigious regions.""

Sommeliers International ""At Château Marjosse the land possesses yet another specific feature, known locally as “la Boulbène”, a silty-clayey texture that has developed on ancient alluvions. The fertility of these soils no longer needs to be proved, because, by chance, they are also found in Saint-Emilion, a terroir that is extremely familiar to the man who manages “Cheval Blanc” …. Pierre Lurton. Assisted in this transformation by Consultant-Oenologist Pascal Poussevin, whose recommendations range from vine growing to wine-making, Pierre Lurton’s estate has now reached its cruising speed … Beyond the fabulous adventures he experiences in his role as manager of Châteaux d’Yquem, Cheval Blanc, as well as estates in South Africa, Latin America and in Australia … it is undoubtedly with “the salt of this land here in the Entre-deux-Mers” that his years of quest for perfection will be revealed. It is clear that this region needs winegrowers of such calibre, those who possess a sixth sense and, using techniques that almost resemble intentional alchemy, transform the grapes they touch into wines that exude the unique character of a specific area.""

The Entre-deux-Mers region, nicknamed by wine experts as “Little Tuscany”, is unique and jealously protected by its inhabitants. ""There are fifteen appellations that constitute the Entre-deux-Mers. The most well-known of them all, reputed for its dry, lively white wines, is certainly the one which bears the name of this region! The Entre-deux-Mers cultivates a certain speciality in producing white wines, due to its basic geological assets, possessing gravelly-limestone soils, upon which Sémillon, Sauvignon, Muscadelle and even Ugni Blanc grape varieties are planted. But the variety of soils and sub-soils associated with such a complex landscape provides a diversity of terroirs … These are favourable for producing red wines, that are regrettably not sufficiently well-known, but highly prized for the complexity of their aromas, their deep, vivid colour, as well as the concentration and elegance of their tannins."" Sommeliers International.

Bordeaux, in the southwest of France, needs little introduction as one of the world's most famous, prestigious and prolific wine regions. Its three trump cards are diversity, quality and quantity. The majority of Bordeaux wines (nearly 90 percent of production volume) are the dry, medium- and full-bodied red Bordeaux Blends that established its reputation. The finest (and most expensive) of these come from the great châteaux of the Haut-Médoc and the Right Bank appellations Saint-Émilion and Pomerol. The legendary reds are complemented by high-quality white wines, both dry styles (particularly from Pessac-Léognan) and the sweet, botrytized nectars of Sauternes.

Sauvignon Gris is a pink-berried mutation of the Sauvignon Blanc grape. It most likely originated around Bordeaux, but has found itself quite at home in Chile. Sauvignon Gris is thinly scattered across other parts of the wine world, including Uruguay, New Zealand, the United States and Switzerland.

Its popularity among growers was historically severely limited by its low yields; in France in 2009 there were (officially) only 463 hectares (1144 acres) of vines. However plantings may be on the increase, in the Loire, in Bordeaux to add body to Sauvignon Blanc, and elsewhere around the world. While the clone is not legally permitted in some Loire appellations – such as Sancerre – it is generally agreed that Sauvignon Gris vines are present in a good number of vineyards in such zones.

Sauvignon Gris is less aromatic than its Sauvignon Blanc sibling, but certainly capable of producing interesting wines. Wines produced from Sauvignon Gris tend to be richer and more voluptuous in texture than Sauvignon Blanc, with ripe fruit flavors of mango and melon as well as citrus notes. The wines are usually dry and tend to have some of the herbaceous notes so typical of the Sauvignon family. The type of color mutation seen in Sauvignon Gris is a naturally occurring phenomenon and reasonably common. For example, Roter Riesling is a pink-skinned mutation of Riesling, Chardonnay Rosé is a mutation of Chardonnay and Pinot Gris is a light-berried variant of Pinot Noir. Sauvignon Gris is also often blended with Sauvignon Blanc, including examples where the former is a minor (usually uncredited) component of New World varietal Sauvignon Blanc wines.

The Sauvignon Blanc taste is one of the most identifiable in the world of white wines for a few reasons. First, it always has crisp, high acidity. Second, it has a chemical compound called pyrazine which gives grassy, herbal or bell pepper flavors. When grown in cooler climates or picked early, the herbaceous green character is most prominent. In warmer climates or allowed to hang longer on the vine, the pyrazine character diminishes in favor of riper fruit flavors ranging from grapefruit, to passion fruit and guava.

Sémillon is one of the wine world's unsung heroes. The gold-skinned grape produces France's most famous and revered sweet wines, notably Sauternes, and some of the greatest dry white wines of Australia - particulary those in the Hunter Valley.

Bordeaux is celebrated for producing some of the world's most esteemed red blends, characterized by their complexity, structure, and age-worthiness. This exclusive collection features a variety of Bordeaux wines, each bottle offers a unique expression of Bordeaux's diverse terroirs and winemaking traditions. Our Bordeaux Wine Mixed - 6 pack value provides the perfect opportunity to explore the iconic wines of this historic region. Ideal for sharing with friends and family or for stocking your cellar with premium Bordeaux selections, this 6-pack offers exceptional value and unparalleled taste experiences.

1 x Château Du Vieux Montpezat (Organic) 2016 ~ Bordeaux, France

Organic