Langlet Brut Champagne Deluxe Cheese Tasting Pack
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Langlet Brut Champagne Deluxe Cheese Tasting Pack
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Langlet Brut Champagne Deluxe Cheese Tasting Pack

$216
Quantity

This is Great……and Here’s Why!

Discover the pinnacle of luxury with our Langlet Brut Champagne deluxe cheese tasting pack. Immerse yourself in the elegance of Langlet Brut Champagne, a finely crafted bubbly that exudes sophistication and taste.

1 x Langlet Brut Grande Réserve Champagne Gift-Box - Champagne, France

Sommeliers International "...delicate, fine, aromatic, a touch of fruit compote. Fresh. Palate; generous. Maturity; freshness in the finish."

Dirk Schram "The entire Maison Langlet philosophy is reflected in this champagne. Light golden yellow in color with an even, fine bubble. Flowers and exotic scents predominate in the aroma. In terms of taste, a great aromatic finesse and hint of citrus fruits follow. This is the perfect cuvée for an aperitif!"

The Winemaker “A pale gold colour with tiny, regular bubbles. Floral and exotic notes stand out in the aroma. The taste offers a wonderful aromatic finesse and a final zest of citrus. The perfect cuvée for an aperitif!”

45% Pinot Noir, 35% Chardonnay; 20% Pinot Meunierx

Gold Medal Wine Club "...from France’s esteemed Champagne Langlet, a progressive and ultra-modern new Champagne house located in the village of Gland on the right bank of France’s Marne Valley."

Langlet Champagne are an award winning new French Champagne producer. Their “exceptional” 2009 Vintage Extra Brut Champagne was awarded a gold medal by the Beverage Tasting Insitute. An alliance of three accomplished French winemakers and friends - Vincent Metiver, Luc Chaudron and Frederic Papelard. Langlet champagne is produced from the chalky vineyards between renowned Château Thierry and Epernay in the region of Champagne, France.

Champagne is the most iconic sparkling wine in the world, produced and named for the Champagne region of France. Synonymous with celebration, champagne is produced from a few specific varieties of grapes: pinot noir, chardonnay, and pinot meunier.

The Champagne region lies at the northern edge of the world's vineyard-growing areas, with lower average temperatures than any other French wine region. In this kind of cool climate, the growing season is rarely warm enough to ripen grapes to the levels required for standard winemaking. Even in temperate years, Champagne's grapes still bear the hallmark acidity of a marginal climate, and it was only the discovery of secondary fermentation that provided a wine style capable of harnessing – and even embracing – this tartness.

Champagne is the most iconic sparkling wine in the world, produced in the region of Champagne in France. Synonymous with celebration, champagne is typically produced from a few specific varieties of grapes: pinot noir, chardonnay, and pinot meunier. With effervescent flavors of citrus, almond, and apple, champagne comes in varying levels of sweetness and has a moderate amount of alcohol. The most treasured Champagnes age for a minimum of 3 years.

1 x Salin Domaine de Tamary ~ Cotes de Provence Rosé 2021 ~ Provence, France

89/100 Robert Parker
88/100 Wine Enthusiast
16/20 Jancis Robinson
89/100 Robert Parker
92/1-- Decanter (2019 vintage)
15.5/20 Jancis Robinson (2019 vintage)
90/100 Falstaff (2015 Vintage)
16/20 Vinum Wine Magazine (2015 vintage)

5 Stars, Kerry Wines
5 Stars, Millesima - France
4,5 Stars, The Wine Merchant Ltd (2020 vintage)

Robert Parker "A blend of 45% Grenache, 20% Cinsault, 10% each Rolle (Vermentino) and Syrah, plus 5% each of Mourvèdre, Sémillon and Tibouren, Tamary's 2020 Cotes de Provence Rose is a pale, coppery rosé that reveals hints of brine to go alongside peach, melon and citrus notes. It's medium-bodied and nicely rounded and generous on the palate, with a gentle, easy-drinking and harmonious finish."

Roger Voss, Wine Enthusiast "A blend of six grapes, this pale-pink wine is aromatic and attractively ripe, with a mineral edge to freshness. The red fruits, citrus flavors and crisp aftertaste make the wine immediately attractive. Drink now."

Decanter "Owned by Jean-Luc Zuger of Malescot St Exupéry (along with Frédéric Salin of Salin négociants), this is savoury to the point that you can almost taste a salt-licked tang on the finish, and the slate texture is marked, as are gentle redcurrant notes. This quality makes it quite unusual, and gives it presence. One for fans of not overly sweet rosés - of which I am one." (2019 vintage)

Robert Parker "A blend of 40% each Cinsault and Grenache, with 13% Syrah and 7% Mourvèdre, Tamary's 2019 Cotes de Provence Rose offers sedate notes of cantaloupe and lime zest. It's medium-bodied and plump in the mouth, with that zesty, slightly bitter note providing energy across the palate and through the long finish." (2019 vintage)

Falstaff "Pale salmon pink, silver reflections. Fresh white apple, a hint of red berries, lime zest, good minerality. Medium-bodied, fine fruity sweetness, well balanced by a lively acidity, lingers, fine touch of ripe pear in the finish, a versatile, summery food accompaniment." (2015 vintage)

Vinum Wine Magazine "As soon as the pink Côtes de Provence sparkles in the glass, the movie starts rolling in your head: Angelina and Brad in the "Café Sénéquier" at the port of Saint-Tropez. In the glass: the rosé that grows directly behind the beach. In the past, it often tasted clumsy, old-fashioned and alcoholic. But in recent years, the winegrowers have stepped on the gas. The Tamary rosé is a blend of Cinsault, Grenache and Mourvèdre. Aromas of summer herbs, flowers and roses. Soft on the palate, with southern charm and yet wholesome" (2015 vintage)

Made by one of the World's Top 10 winemakers

Wine-maker, Jean-Luc Zuger has been praised by top wine critics as "miraculous"

The Winemaker "Lovely aromas of citrus and flowers lead to a charming, sensual palate of berries, flowers and saline-laced minerals."

Made of 45% Grenache, 35% Cinsault, 15% Mourvèdre and 5% Rolle.

Winemaker, Jean Luc Zuger is the owner of a famuos Chateau in the Bordeaux appellation of Margaux. Together with Ferderic Salin; owner of the famous Bordeaux based négociant firm they bought and created Domaine de Tamary. Both share a passion for Provence rosé.

This is the result of that love, which saw them purchase the Domaine Tamary and look to seek-out its best possible incarnations. This wine pays respect to the steep slopes on which the Cinsault grapes are grown. These slopes, or "terrassess", provide vital exposure to the sunshine, protection from the strong mistral winds and resistance to disease that are key components to retaining the freshness and crisp balance in this wine.

The Guide Hachette des Vins - the bible of the French wine industry - gave Zuger’s 2007 Bordeaux its highest three-star rating, a score reserved for exceptional wines that are a perfect example of their appellation.

Cotes de Provence is the largest appellation of the famous wine region of Provence. It covers roughly 50,000 acres (20,250ha) of vineyards, which produce the vast majority of Provence's Rosé wine.

Although it also covers red and white wine, about 85% of Cotes de Provence's wine is Rosé, made predominantly from Grenache, Syrah, Mourvedre, Cinsaut and the quintessentially Provencal grape Tibouren.

1 x Chateau Marjosse Pierre Lurton Cuvee Palombre White 2020 - Bordeaux, France

92/100 James Suckiing
93/100 James Sucking (2019 vintage)
92/100 Jean Marc Quarin (2019 vintage)
90/100 Jeff Leve, The Wine Cellar Insider (2019 vintage)
16.5/20 Jancis Robinson (2019 vintage)

Owned by one of the world's most famous winemakers, Pierre Lurton - president of two of Bordeaux's best-known chateaux, the Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) owned Château Cheval Blanc and Château d’Yquem.

James Suckling, ''..I like the density and concentration, with a delicious creaminess undercut by herb and spice...Almonds, fennel, yoghurt, grapefruit and pear skins on the nose, with some cloves and white pepper.''

Jancis Robinson "Cuvée Palombe, a startlingly rich white based on 45- to 70-year-old vines named after a pigeon. The blend is a third each of Sémillon, Sauvignon Blanc and the more perfumed Sauvignon Gris but seems to me to be dominated by the lovely beeswax and lanolin flavours of fully ripe Sémillon, a grape variety more often encountered in sweet white bordeaux. I originally tasted the wine at room temperature when it seemed almost fat, until a nice cooling breeze of Sauvignon Blanc blew across my palate on the finish. The wine benefited from being restored to the cellar before I tasted it a second time, when it was, again, such a welcome and characterful contrast to the technically perfect Sauvignon-dominated style that has become typical of Bordeaux Blanc." (2019 vintage)


James Suckling, "..Focused and elegant...A medium-to full-bodied white with complex aromas of dried lime, apricot, green mango, flint and toast. It’s textured and creamy with crisp acidity and flinty, subtly smoky layers." (2019 vintage)

Jeff Leve, The Wine Cellar Insider "Flowers, lemon rind, spearmint and honeysuckle notes are all over the place. Fresh, forward, fruity and with a creamy, yellow, citrus rind finish, with just a drizzle of honey, you can enjoy this on release." (2019 vintage)

Château Marjosse is owned by French 'wine royalty', Pierre Lurton - president of two of Bordeaux’s best-known châteaux; the Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) owned, Château Cheval Blanc and Château d’Yquem, Château Marjosse. Pierre Lurton comes from two of the great Bordeaux families. His father Dominique was the youngest son of the paterfamilias François Lurton; his uncle André Lurton who founded the eponymous wine company; his many cousins run châteaux from Pauillac to Pomerol. His mother is from the famous Lafite family.

The influential Club Enologique asserts that Pierre is the most accomplished wine personality of his famous family. Trained as a doctor but swapping his studies for wine making after four years. At 23 he took over Clos Fourtet in St Emilion, one of the fine Lurton properties, and in 1991 he was appointed head of Château Cheval Blanc (it was bought by Bernard Arnault of LVMH in 1998); in 1999 he took on Château d’Yquem, which had just been added to the Arnault portfolio.

Club Enologique describes Pierre Lurton as having the world’s most corporate wine job. "However he divides his time between two of the world’s most exalted wine properties, but comes down to earth in Entre-deux-Mers, the leafy, unpretentious appellation to the east of Bordeaux at Château Marjosse."

The Château Marjosse estate is located in Entre-deux-Mers, on the right bank of Bordeaux. Initially owned by the wine merchant Bernard Chénier, Château Marjosse was acquired by the Deleuze family, who, in 1990, gave some plots to Pierre Lurton to rent. In 1992, Pierre Lurton, who grew up in Château Reynier, neighbour to this magnificent Chartreuse, moved to a second home in Château Marjosse and, over successive years became the owner of the entire vineyard, as well as the Chartreuse in 2013.

Decanter "Since Lurton bought Château Marjosse in 1994, the estate has improved beyond recognition. Pierre's father, Dominique Lurton, also made over a further 30ha so that, under the Château Marjosse label, Lurton now exploits 42ha of vineyard, six hectares of white and 36ha of Bordeaux red – a total of 300,000 bottles a year. Pierre insists his wine is Bordeaux and not Bordeaux Supérieur because ‘my wine is only supérieur in the bottle’. His objectives are ambitious. As the quality of the terroir with clay-limestone soil is similar to some of the better areas in Saint-Emilion, he hopes to prove that wines from this area can rival those from more prestigious regions."

Sommeliers International "At Château Marjosse the land possesses yet another specific feature, known locally as “la Boulbène”, a silty-clayey texture that has developed on ancient alluvions. The fertility of these soils no longer needs to be proved, because, by chance, they are also found in Saint-Emilion, a terroir that is extremely familiar to the man who manages “Cheval Blanc” …. Pierre Lurton. Assisted in this transformation by Consultant-Oenologist Pascal Poussevin, whose recommendations range from vine growing to wine-making, Pierre Lurton’s estate has now reached its cruising speed … Beyond the fabulous adventures he experiences in his role as manager of Châteaux d’Yquem, Cheval Blanc, as well as estates in South Africa, Latin America and in Australia … it is undoubtedly with “the salt of this land here in the Entre-deux-Mers” that his years of quest for perfection will be revealed. It is clear that this region needs winegrowers of such calibre, those who possess a sixth sense and, using techniques that almost resemble intentional alchemy, transform the grapes they touch into wines that exude the unique character of a specific area."

The Entre-deux-Mers region, nicknamed by wine experts as “Little Tuscany”, is unique and jealously protected by its inhabitants. "There are fifteen appellations that constitute the Entre-deux-Mers. The most well-known of them all, reputed for its dry, lively white wines, is certainly the one which bears the name of this region! The Entre-deux-Mers cultivates a certain speciality in producing white wines, due to its basic geological assets, possessing gravelly-limestone soils, upon which Sémillon, Sauvignon, Muscadelle and even Ugni Blanc grape varieties are planted. But the variety of soils and sub-soils associated with such a complex landscape provides a diversity of terroirs … These are favourable for producing red wines, that are regrettably not sufficiently well-known, but highly prized for the complexity of their aromas, their deep, vivid colour, as well as the concentration and elegance of their tannins." Sommeliers International.

Bordeaux, in the southwest of France, needs little introduction as one of the world's most famous, prestigious and prolific wine regions. Its three trump cards are diversity, quality and quantity. The majority of Bordeaux wines (nearly 90 percent of production volume) are the dry, medium- and full-bodied red Bordeaux Blends that established its reputation. The finest (and most expensive) of these come from the great châteaux of the Haut-Médoc and the Right Bank appellations Saint-Émilion and Pomerol. The legendary reds are complemented by high-quality white wines, both dry styles (particularly from Pessac-Léognan) and the sweet, botrytized nectars of Sauternes.

Sauvignon Gris is a pink-berried mutation of the Sauvignon Blanc grape. It most likely originated around Bordeaux, but has found itself quite at home in Chile. Sauvignon Gris is thinly scattered across other parts of the wine world, including Uruguay, New Zealand, the United States and Switzerland.

Its popularity among growers was historically severely limited by its low yields; in France in 2009 there were (officially) only 463 hectares (1144 acres) of vines. However plantings may be on the increase, in the Loire, in Bordeaux to add body to Sauvignon Blanc, and elsewhere around the world. While the clone is not legally permitted in some Loire appellations – such as Sancerre – it is generally agreed that Sauvignon Gris vines are present in a good number of vineyards in such zones.

Sauvignon Gris is less aromatic than its Sauvignon Blanc sibling, but certainly capable of producing interesting wines. Wines produced from Sauvignon Gris tend to be richer and more voluptuous in texture than Sauvignon Blanc, with ripe fruit flavors of mango and melon as well as citrus notes. The wines are usually dry and tend to have some of the herbaceous notes so typical of the Sauvignon family. The type of color mutation seen in Sauvignon Gris is a naturally occurring phenomenon and reasonably common. For example, Roter Riesling is a pink-skinned mutation of Riesling, Chardonnay Rosé is a mutation of Chardonnay and Pinot Gris is a light-berried variant of Pinot Noir. Sauvignon Gris is also often blended with Sauvignon Blanc, including examples where the former is a minor (usually uncredited) component of New World varietal Sauvignon Blanc wines.

The Sauvignon Blanc taste is one of the most identifiable in the world of white wines for a few reasons. First, it always has crisp, high acidity. Second, it has a chemical compound called pyrazine which gives grassy, herbal or bell pepper flavors. When grown in cooler climates or picked early, the herbaceous green character is most prominent. In warmer climates or allowed to hang longer on the vine, the pyrazine character diminishes in favor of riper fruit flavors ranging from grapefruit, to passion fruit and guava.

Sémillon is one of the wine world's unsung heroes. The gold-skinned grape produces France's most famous and revered sweet wines, notably Sauternes, and some of the greatest dry white wines of Australia - particulary those in the Hunter Valley.

1 x Bottega IL Vino Dei Poeti Prosecco DOC Extra Dry 2021 ~ Veneto, Italy

Multi-award winning winery
Silver - Decanter World Wine Awards 2020
Bottega is famous for its top-end Prosecco served in gold bottles.

John Szabo, Master Sommelier (MS) "A prosecco made in a gentle, barely off-dry style (though still brut), lightly effervescent, crisp, fruity and floral. This is the sort of stuff to buy in quantity to have on hand for that spontaneous moment; it will appeal widely and fit almost any occasion, at a fine price. (Tasted December 2014).

Rhys Pender MW (Master of Wine) "Floral, pear, green apple and honeydew melon notes on the nose. The palate has a lively, crisp mousse, racy acidity and green apple and mineral flavours in this dry Prosecco."

The Winemaker "Brilliant, with a rich and persistent foam and fine perlage. Straw yellow with fruity, flowery notes, with scents of acacia flowers, apple, white peach and citrus fruits. The taste is Fresh, delicate, fragrant and well-balanced"

Vino dei Poeti Prosecco DOC is an extra dry sparkling obtained from Glera grapes, grown in the province of Treviso with classic, traditional techniques. Over time, their quality and typicality has remained unchanged. These are also the main features of Prosecco wine, the most renowned and sold wine worldwide.

Extra dry. It is a barely off-dry style Prosecco.

Bottega creates Prosecco in Venoto Italy using the classified Glera grape.

Discover the pinnacle of luxury with our Langlet Brut Champagne deluxe cheese tasting pack. Immerse yourself in the elegance of Langlet Brut Champagne, a finely crafted bubbly that exudes sophistication and taste.

1 x Langlet Brut Grande Réserve Champagne Gift-Box - Champagne, France

Sommeliers International "...delicate, fine, aromatic, a touch of fruit compote. Fresh. Palate; generous. Maturity; freshness in the finish."

Dirk Schram "The entire Maison Langlet philosophy is reflected in this champagne. Light golden yellow in color with an even, fine bubble. Flowers and exotic scents predominate in the aroma. In terms of taste, a great aromatic finesse and hint of citrus fruits follow. This is the perfect cuvée for an aperitif!"

The Winemaker “A pale gold colour with tiny, regular bubbles. Floral and exotic notes stand out in the aroma. The taste offers a wonderful aromatic finesse and a final zest of citrus. The perfect cuvée for an aperitif!”

45% Pinot Noir, 35% Chardonnay; 20% Pinot Meunierx

Gold Medal Wine Club "...from France’s esteemed Champagne Langlet, a progressive and ultra-modern new Champagne house located in the village of Gland on the right bank of France’s Marne Valley."

Langlet Champagne are an award winning new French Champagne producer. Their “exceptional” 2009 Vintage Extra Brut Champagne was awarded a gold medal by the Beverage Tasting Insitute. An alliance of three accomplished French winemakers and friends - Vincent Metiver, Luc Chaudron and Frederic Papelard. Langlet champagne is produced from the chalky vineyards between renowned Château Thierry and Epernay in the region of Champagne, France.

Champagne is the most iconic sparkling wine in the world, produced and named for the Champagne region of France. Synonymous with celebration, champagne is produced from a few specific varieties of grapes: pinot noir, chardonnay, and pinot meunier.

The Champagne region lies at the northern edge of the world's vineyard-growing areas, with lower average temperatures than any other French wine region. In this kind of cool climate, the growing season is rarely warm enough to ripen grapes to the levels required for standard winemaking. Even in temperate years, Champagne's grapes still bear the hallmark acidity of a marginal climate, and it was only the discovery of secondary fermentation that provided a wine style capable of harnessing – and even embracing – this tartness.

Champagne is the most iconic sparkling wine in the world, produced in the region of Champagne in France. Synonymous with celebration, champagne is typically produced from a few specific varieties of grapes: pinot noir, chardonnay, and pinot meunier. With effervescent flavors of citrus, almond, and apple, champagne comes in varying levels of sweetness and has a moderate amount of alcohol. The most treasured Champagnes age for a minimum of 3 years.

1 x Salin Domaine de Tamary ~ Cotes de Provence Rosé 2021 ~ Provence, France

89/100 Robert Parker
88/100 Wine Enthusiast
16/20 Jancis Robinson
89/100 Robert Parker
92/1-- Decanter (2019 vintage)
15.5/20 Jancis Robinson (2019 vintage)
90/100 Falstaff (2015 Vintage)
16/20 Vinum Wine Magazine (2015 vintage)

5 Stars, Kerry Wines
5 Stars, Millesima - France
4,5 Stars, The Wine Merchant Ltd (2020 vintage)

Robert Parker "A blend of 45% Grenache, 20% Cinsault, 10% each Rolle (Vermentino) and Syrah, plus 5% each of Mourvèdre, Sémillon and Tibouren, Tamary's 2020 Cotes de Provence Rose is a pale, coppery rosé that reveals hints of brine to go alongside peach, melon and citrus notes. It's medium-bodied and nicely rounded and generous on the palate, with a gentle, easy-drinking and harmonious finish."

Roger Voss, Wine Enthusiast "A blend of six grapes, this pale-pink wine is aromatic and attractively ripe, with a mineral edge to freshness. The red fruits, citrus flavors and crisp aftertaste make the wine immediately attractive. Drink now."

Decanter "Owned by Jean-Luc Zuger of Malescot St Exupéry (along with Frédéric Salin of Salin négociants), this is savoury to the point that you can almost taste a salt-licked tang on the finish, and the slate texture is marked, as are gentle redcurrant notes. This quality makes it quite unusual, and gives it presence. One for fans of not overly sweet rosés - of which I am one." (2019 vintage)

Robert Parker "A blend of 40% each Cinsault and Grenache, with 13% Syrah and 7% Mourvèdre, Tamary's 2019 Cotes de Provence Rose offers sedate notes of cantaloupe and lime zest. It's medium-bodied and plump in the mouth, with that zesty, slightly bitter note providing energy across the palate and through the long finish." (2019 vintage)

Falstaff "Pale salmon pink, silver reflections. Fresh white apple, a hint of red berries, lime zest, good minerality. Medium-bodied, fine fruity sweetness, well balanced by a lively acidity, lingers, fine touch of ripe pear in the finish, a versatile, summery food accompaniment." (2015 vintage)

Vinum Wine Magazine "As soon as the pink Côtes de Provence sparkles in the glass, the movie starts rolling in your head: Angelina and Brad in the "Café Sénéquier" at the port of Saint-Tropez. In the glass: the rosé that grows directly behind the beach. In the past, it often tasted clumsy, old-fashioned and alcoholic. But in recent years, the winegrowers have stepped on the gas. The Tamary rosé is a blend of Cinsault, Grenache and Mourvèdre. Aromas of summer herbs, flowers and roses. Soft on the palate, with southern charm and yet wholesome" (2015 vintage)

Made by one of the World's Top 10 winemakers

Wine-maker, Jean-Luc Zuger has been praised by top wine critics as "miraculous"

The Winemaker "Lovely aromas of citrus and flowers lead to a charming, sensual palate of berries, flowers and saline-laced minerals."

Made of 45% Grenache, 35% Cinsault, 15% Mourvèdre and 5% Rolle.

Winemaker, Jean Luc Zuger is the owner of a famuos Chateau in the Bordeaux appellation of Margaux. Together with Ferderic Salin; owner of the famous Bordeaux based négociant firm they bought and created Domaine de Tamary. Both share a passion for Provence rosé.

This is the result of that love, which saw them purchase the Domaine Tamary and look to seek-out its best possible incarnations. This wine pays respect to the steep slopes on which the Cinsault grapes are grown. These slopes, or "terrassess", provide vital exposure to the sunshine, protection from the strong mistral winds and resistance to disease that are key components to retaining the freshness and crisp balance in this wine.

The Guide Hachette des Vins - the bible of the French wine industry - gave Zuger’s 2007 Bordeaux its highest three-star rating, a score reserved for exceptional wines that are a perfect example of their appellation.

Cotes de Provence is the largest appellation of the famous wine region of Provence. It covers roughly 50,000 acres (20,250ha) of vineyards, which produce the vast majority of Provence's Rosé wine.

Although it also covers red and white wine, about 85% of Cotes de Provence's wine is Rosé, made predominantly from Grenache, Syrah, Mourvedre, Cinsaut and the quintessentially Provencal grape Tibouren.

1 x Chateau Marjosse Pierre Lurton Cuvee Palombre White 2020 - Bordeaux, France

92/100 James Suckiing
93/100 James Sucking (2019 vintage)
92/100 Jean Marc Quarin (2019 vintage)
90/100 Jeff Leve, The Wine Cellar Insider (2019 vintage)
16.5/20 Jancis Robinson (2019 vintage)

Owned by one of the world's most famous winemakers, Pierre Lurton - president of two of Bordeaux's best-known chateaux, the Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) owned Château Cheval Blanc and Château d’Yquem.

James Suckling, ''..I like the density and concentration, with a delicious creaminess undercut by herb and spice...Almonds, fennel, yoghurt, grapefruit and pear skins on the nose, with some cloves and white pepper.''

Jancis Robinson "Cuvée Palombe, a startlingly rich white based on 45- to 70-year-old vines named after a pigeon. The blend is a third each of Sémillon, Sauvignon Blanc and the more perfumed Sauvignon Gris but seems to me to be dominated by the lovely beeswax and lanolin flavours of fully ripe Sémillon, a grape variety more often encountered in sweet white bordeaux. I originally tasted the wine at room temperature when it seemed almost fat, until a nice cooling breeze of Sauvignon Blanc blew across my palate on the finish. The wine benefited from being restored to the cellar before I tasted it a second time, when it was, again, such a welcome and characterful contrast to the technically perfect Sauvignon-dominated style that has become typical of Bordeaux Blanc." (2019 vintage)


James Suckling, "..Focused and elegant...A medium-to full-bodied white with complex aromas of dried lime, apricot, green mango, flint and toast. It’s textured and creamy with crisp acidity and flinty, subtly smoky layers." (2019 vintage)

Jeff Leve, The Wine Cellar Insider "Flowers, lemon rind, spearmint and honeysuckle notes are all over the place. Fresh, forward, fruity and with a creamy, yellow, citrus rind finish, with just a drizzle of honey, you can enjoy this on release." (2019 vintage)

Château Marjosse is owned by French 'wine royalty', Pierre Lurton - president of two of Bordeaux’s best-known châteaux; the Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) owned, Château Cheval Blanc and Château d’Yquem, Château Marjosse. Pierre Lurton comes from two of the great Bordeaux families. His father Dominique was the youngest son of the paterfamilias François Lurton; his uncle André Lurton who founded the eponymous wine company; his many cousins run châteaux from Pauillac to Pomerol. His mother is from the famous Lafite family.

The influential Club Enologique asserts that Pierre is the most accomplished wine personality of his famous family. Trained as a doctor but swapping his studies for wine making after four years. At 23 he took over Clos Fourtet in St Emilion, one of the fine Lurton properties, and in 1991 he was appointed head of Château Cheval Blanc (it was bought by Bernard Arnault of LVMH in 1998); in 1999 he took on Château d’Yquem, which had just been added to the Arnault portfolio.

Club Enologique describes Pierre Lurton as having the world’s most corporate wine job. "However he divides his time between two of the world’s most exalted wine properties, but comes down to earth in Entre-deux-Mers, the leafy, unpretentious appellation to the east of Bordeaux at Château Marjosse."

The Château Marjosse estate is located in Entre-deux-Mers, on the right bank of Bordeaux. Initially owned by the wine merchant Bernard Chénier, Château Marjosse was acquired by the Deleuze family, who, in 1990, gave some plots to Pierre Lurton to rent. In 1992, Pierre Lurton, who grew up in Château Reynier, neighbour to this magnificent Chartreuse, moved to a second home in Château Marjosse and, over successive years became the owner of the entire vineyard, as well as the Chartreuse in 2013.

Decanter "Since Lurton bought Château Marjosse in 1994, the estate has improved beyond recognition. Pierre's father, Dominique Lurton, also made over a further 30ha so that, under the Château Marjosse label, Lurton now exploits 42ha of vineyard, six hectares of white and 36ha of Bordeaux red – a total of 300,000 bottles a year. Pierre insists his wine is Bordeaux and not Bordeaux Supérieur because ‘my wine is only supérieur in the bottle’. His objectives are ambitious. As the quality of the terroir with clay-limestone soil is similar to some of the better areas in Saint-Emilion, he hopes to prove that wines from this area can rival those from more prestigious regions."

Sommeliers International "At Château Marjosse the land possesses yet another specific feature, known locally as “la Boulbène”, a silty-clayey texture that has developed on ancient alluvions. The fertility of these soils no longer needs to be proved, because, by chance, they are also found in Saint-Emilion, a terroir that is extremely familiar to the man who manages “Cheval Blanc” …. Pierre Lurton. Assisted in this transformation by Consultant-Oenologist Pascal Poussevin, whose recommendations range from vine growing to wine-making, Pierre Lurton’s estate has now reached its cruising speed … Beyond the fabulous adventures he experiences in his role as manager of Châteaux d’Yquem, Cheval Blanc, as well as estates in South Africa, Latin America and in Australia … it is undoubtedly with “the salt of this land here in the Entre-deux-Mers” that his years of quest for perfection will be revealed. It is clear that this region needs winegrowers of such calibre, those who possess a sixth sense and, using techniques that almost resemble intentional alchemy, transform the grapes they touch into wines that exude the unique character of a specific area."

The Entre-deux-Mers region, nicknamed by wine experts as “Little Tuscany”, is unique and jealously protected by its inhabitants. "There are fifteen appellations that constitute the Entre-deux-Mers. The most well-known of them all, reputed for its dry, lively white wines, is certainly the one which bears the name of this region! The Entre-deux-Mers cultivates a certain speciality in producing white wines, due to its basic geological assets, possessing gravelly-limestone soils, upon which Sémillon, Sauvignon, Muscadelle and even Ugni Blanc grape varieties are planted. But the variety of soils and sub-soils associated with such a complex landscape provides a diversity of terroirs … These are favourable for producing red wines, that are regrettably not sufficiently well-known, but highly prized for the complexity of their aromas, their deep, vivid colour, as well as the concentration and elegance of their tannins." Sommeliers International.

Bordeaux, in the southwest of France, needs little introduction as one of the world's most famous, prestigious and prolific wine regions. Its three trump cards are diversity, quality and quantity. The majority of Bordeaux wines (nearly 90 percent of production volume) are the dry, medium- and full-bodied red Bordeaux Blends that established its reputation. The finest (and most expensive) of these come from the great châteaux of the Haut-Médoc and the Right Bank appellations Saint-Émilion and Pomerol. The legendary reds are complemented by high-quality white wines, both dry styles (particularly from Pessac-Léognan) and the sweet, botrytized nectars of Sauternes.

Sauvignon Gris is a pink-berried mutation of the Sauvignon Blanc grape. It most likely originated around Bordeaux, but has found itself quite at home in Chile. Sauvignon Gris is thinly scattered across other parts of the wine world, including Uruguay, New Zealand, the United States and Switzerland.

Its popularity among growers was historically severely limited by its low yields; in France in 2009 there were (officially) only 463 hectares (1144 acres) of vines. However plantings may be on the increase, in the Loire, in Bordeaux to add body to Sauvignon Blanc, and elsewhere around the world. While the clone is not legally permitted in some Loire appellations – such as Sancerre – it is generally agreed that Sauvignon Gris vines are present in a good number of vineyards in such zones.

Sauvignon Gris is less aromatic than its Sauvignon Blanc sibling, but certainly capable of producing interesting wines. Wines produced from Sauvignon Gris tend to be richer and more voluptuous in texture than Sauvignon Blanc, with ripe fruit flavors of mango and melon as well as citrus notes. The wines are usually dry and tend to have some of the herbaceous notes so typical of the Sauvignon family. The type of color mutation seen in Sauvignon Gris is a naturally occurring phenomenon and reasonably common. For example, Roter Riesling is a pink-skinned mutation of Riesling, Chardonnay Rosé is a mutation of Chardonnay and Pinot Gris is a light-berried variant of Pinot Noir. Sauvignon Gris is also often blended with Sauvignon Blanc, including examples where the former is a minor (usually uncredited) component of New World varietal Sauvignon Blanc wines.

The Sauvignon Blanc taste is one of the most identifiable in the world of white wines for a few reasons. First, it always has crisp, high acidity. Second, it has a chemical compound called pyrazine which gives grassy, herbal or bell pepper flavors. When grown in cooler climates or picked early, the herbaceous green character is most prominent. In warmer climates or allowed to hang longer on the vine, the pyrazine character diminishes in favor of riper fruit flavors ranging from grapefruit, to passion fruit and guava.

Sémillon is one of the wine world's unsung heroes. The gold-skinned grape produces France's most famous and revered sweet wines, notably Sauternes, and some of the greatest dry white wines of Australia - particulary those in the Hunter Valley.

1 x Bottega IL Vino Dei Poeti Prosecco DOC Extra Dry 2021 ~ Veneto, Italy

Multi-award winning winery
Silver - Decanter World Wine Awards 2020
Bottega is famous for its top-end Prosecco served in gold bottles.

John Szabo, Master Sommelier (MS) "A prosecco made in a gentle, barely off-dry style (though still brut), lightly effervescent, crisp, fruity and floral. This is the sort of stuff to buy in quantity to have on hand for that spontaneous moment; it will appeal widely and fit almost any occasion, at a fine price. (Tasted December 2014).

Rhys Pender MW (Master of Wine) "Floral, pear, green apple and honeydew melon notes on the nose. The palate has a lively, crisp mousse, racy acidity and green apple and mineral flavours in this dry Prosecco."

The Winemaker "Brilliant, with a rich and persistent foam and fine perlage. Straw yellow with fruity, flowery notes, with scents of acacia flowers, apple, white peach and citrus fruits. The taste is Fresh, delicate, fragrant and well-balanced"

Vino dei Poeti Prosecco DOC is an extra dry sparkling obtained from Glera grapes, grown in the province of Treviso with classic, traditional techniques. Over time, their quality and typicality has remained unchanged. These are also the main features of Prosecco wine, the most renowned and sold wine worldwide.

Extra dry. It is a barely off-dry style Prosecco.

Bottega creates Prosecco in Venoto Italy using the classified Glera grape.