Rocca delle Macie Chianti Classico Famiglia Zingarelli - Tuscany, Italy
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Rocca delle Macie Chianti Classico Famiglia Zingarelli - Tuscany, Italy
Rocca delle Macie Chianti Classico Famiglia Zingarelli - Tuscany, Italy
Rocca delle Macie Chianti Classico Famiglia Zingarelli - Tuscany, Italy
Rocca delle Macie Chianti Classico Famiglia Zingarelli - Tuscany, Italy
google
Rocca delle Macie Chianti Classico Famiglia Zingarelli - Tuscany, Italy
Rocca delle Macie Chianti Classico Famiglia Zingarelli - Tuscany, Italy
Rocca delle Macie Chianti Classico Famiglia Zingarelli - Tuscany, Italy

Rocca delle Macie Chianti Classico Famiglia Zingarelli 2020 - Tuscany, Italy

$43 $52
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This is Great……and Here’s Why!

93/100 Luca Gardini
91/100 James Suckling
91/100 International Wine & Spirit Competition Panel Tasting
90/100 Falstaff Wein Guide Italien 2023 - Othmar Kiem, Simon Staffler
93+/100 Luca Gardini (2019)
92/100 James Suckling (2019)
Kermode,Wieteke Teppema, Luke Harbor (2019)
90/100 Othmar Kiem, Simon Staffler, Falstaff (2018)
91/100 James Suckling (2017)
92/100 James Suckling (2016)
91/100 Bruce Sanderson, Wine Specatator (2016
92/100 Luca Gardini (2014)
90/100 Andrea Briccarello, Andrew Jefford, Susan Hulme MW (2014)
Gold Medal /Best of Show - Mundus Vini (2019)
Gold Medal Mundus Vini (2018)
Bronze - IWSC (2017 vintage)

International Wine & Spirit Competition "Refreshing and beautifully refined.....Dark, dense, and delectable with smooth, mouth-coating tannins, ripe red cherry, baked strawberry, bilberry and smoked meat.''

Luca Gardini "From one of the most recognisable labels of this denomination, a blend of Sangiovese and Merlot marked by a nice aromatic and gustatory profile. Notes of raspberry to the nose, followed by rhubarb and wild iris nuances. 93+ Iodine tannins on the palate, persistence and freshness.''

James Suckling 'Aromas of dried strawberries, orange zest, stones and licorice, followed by a medium body with firm tannins rounding off the savory berry fruit.''

Falstaff Wein Guide Italien 2023 - Othmar Kiem, Simon Staffler ''Brilliant ruby with garnet glints. In the nose there's nuances of fresh cherries with a slightly savoury note emerging. Very juicy and mouth-filling on the palate, with fine-grained tannins and a medium-long finish.''

Luca Gardini ''In the Classico dedicated to the founder also all the crispness of Rocca delle Macìe grapes. The nose reveals notes of raspberry, then nutmeg and marjoram, ending of balsamic hints....fruity, crisp, with brackish 93+ tannins closing of a small red fruits taste.''

Falstaff - Othmar Kiem, Simon Staffler ''Bright ruby with a fine garnet edge. Very fragrant nose, fine cherry and some raspberry. On the palate much grip, in the core a little drying tannin, uncomplicated and honest.''

James Suckling  ''Attractive black-cherry and orange-peel character follows through to a medium body, light tannins and a fruity finish."

Bruce Sanderson, Wine Specatator "A dusting of bittersweet chocolate coats the black cherry and blueberry fruit in this firmly structured red. Bitter almond and earth accents chime in on the dry finish. Best from 2021 through 2035

Andrea Briccarello, Andrew Jefford, Susan Hulme MW ''Seductive nose of violets, blueberry and plums, the simple sweet pleasures. A lively vitality to this wine and a long, persistent, perfumed finish.''

Luca Gardini "Dark fruit, a lot of blackberry and spice on the nose. Fruity again in the mouth, but also spicy due partly to the oak. A substantial savory sensation, which helps the drinkability. Long finish of licorice root."''.

International Wine & Spirit Competition ''lenty of wood spices and dried fruit. The palate has a sweet start, with some strawberries and cinnamon spice, and a nice savoury finish with refreshing acidity.''

Rocca delle Macìe was established in 1973, when film producer Italo Zingarelli – of Ettore Scola’s “We All Loved Each Other So Much” fame, and also the wildly popular series of films featuring comedy duo Bud Spencer and Terence Hill (including “They Call Me Trinity” and “Trinity Is Still My Name”) – decided to realize his lifelong dream by acquiring the “Le Macìe” estate – extending across 93 hectares (230 acres) in all, of which only two were under vine – in order to create a winery in the heart of the Chianti Classico zone.

The company estate now extends to more than 500 hectares (1250 acres) with, in total, more than 200 (500 acres) used as vineyards and 22 (54 acres) as olive groves, subdivided across the company’s six estates: Le Macìe, Sant’Alfonso, Fizzano e le Tavolelle in the Chianti Classico Area, in addition to the Campomaccione and Casa Maria estates in the Morellino di Scansano Area (Maremma).

The Chianti region in Italy's Tuscany wine growing region is split between Chianti and Chianti Classico. Accordingly, two separate DOCG designations apply to wines from the Chianti region: the Chianti Classico DOCG for the heartland of Chianti, and Chianti DOCG for all other Chianti regions. (In 1984, the Chianti region was promoted from DOC to DOCG - Italy’s highest classification - and in 1996, Chianti Classico - the historic heartland of the region - DOCG was created, which gave autonomy to that region. In the last 20 years, a consortium of Chianti Classico producers have researched new Sangiovese clones, replanted vineyards, updated cellar practices and generally made Chianti Classico DOCG a world-class appellation. Chianti Classico must contain a minimum of 75% Sangiovese. In the 2014 edition of its annual compendium of wine ratings, Gambero Rosso noted that Chianti Classico DOCG wines were noteworthy for their “significant return to a more defined style, true to tradition.” The typical Chianti Classico wine is a ruby-red, Sangiovese-based wine with aromas of violets and cherries and a hint of earthy spice.

The Chianti DOCG designation covers wines from six Chianti sub-zones (Colli Pisane, Colli Fiorentini, Colli Senesi, Colli Aretini, Montalbano and Rufina) as well as all other Chianti wines. The Chianti Classico DOCG is located in the very center of Tuscany, between Florence and Sienna.

Tuscany is Italy's third most planted region (behind Sicily and Apulia) but it is eighth in terms of output. After Piedmont and the Veneto, Tuscany produces the third-highest volume of DOC/DOCG wines. More than 80% of the regions' production is in red wine, with the Sangiovese grape being Tuscany's' most prominent grape. Trebbiano is the leading white variety of the region.

The history of viticulture in Tuscany dates back to the Etruscans in the 8th century BC. From the fall of the Roman Empire and throughout the Middle Ages, monasteries were the main purveyors of wines in the region. As the aristocratic and merchant classes emerged, they inherited the share-cropping system of agriculture known as mezzadria. Many Tuscan landowners would turn their half of the grape harvest into wine that would be sold to merchants in Florence. Following the end of the Napoleonic Wars, Tuscany returned to the rule of the Habsburgs. Chianti, Chianti Classico, Brunello di Montalcino, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano and Super Tuscan are Tuscany’s best known wines.

Sangiovese (or Nielluccio in Corsica), a dark-berried vine, is the most widely planted grape variety in Italy. Virtually synonymous with the red wines of Tuscany, and all the romanticism that goes with the territory, Sangiovese is the core constituent in some of the great names in Italian wine. Italy's love affair with Sangiovese – and indeed the world's – is generations old, though recent grapevine research suggests the variety is not as ancient as once thought.
93/100 Luca Gardini
91/100 James Suckling
91/100 International Wine & Spirit Competition Panel Tasting
90/100 Falstaff Wein Guide Italien 2023 - Othmar Kiem, Simon Staffler
93+/100 Luca Gardini (2019)
92/100 James Suckling (2019)
Kermode,Wieteke Teppema, Luke Harbor (2019)
90/100 Othmar Kiem, Simon Staffler, Falstaff (2018)
91/100 James Suckling (2017)
92/100 James Suckling (2016)
91/100 Bruce Sanderson, Wine Specatator (2016
92/100 Luca Gardini (2014)
90/100 Andrea Briccarello, Andrew Jefford, Susan Hulme MW (2014)
Gold Medal /Best of Show - Mundus Vini (2019)
Gold Medal Mundus Vini (2018)
Bronze - IWSC (2017 vintage)

International Wine & Spirit Competition "Refreshing and beautifully refined.....Dark, dense, and delectable with smooth, mouth-coating tannins, ripe red cherry, baked strawberry, bilberry and smoked meat.''

Luca Gardini "From one of the most recognisable labels of this denomination, a blend of Sangiovese and Merlot marked by a nice aromatic and gustatory profile. Notes of raspberry to the nose, followed by rhubarb and wild iris nuances. 93+ Iodine tannins on the palate, persistence and freshness.''

James Suckling 'Aromas of dried strawberries, orange zest, stones and licorice, followed by a medium body with firm tannins rounding off the savory berry fruit.''

Falstaff Wein Guide Italien 2023 - Othmar Kiem, Simon Staffler ''Brilliant ruby with garnet glints. In the nose there's nuances of fresh cherries with a slightly savoury note emerging. Very juicy and mouth-filling on the palate, with fine-grained tannins and a medium-long finish.''

Luca Gardini ''In the Classico dedicated to the founder also all the crispness of Rocca delle Macìe grapes. The nose reveals notes of raspberry, then nutmeg and marjoram, ending of balsamic hints....fruity, crisp, with brackish 93+ tannins closing of a small red fruits taste.''

Falstaff - Othmar Kiem, Simon Staffler ''Bright ruby with a fine garnet edge. Very fragrant nose, fine cherry and some raspberry. On the palate much grip, in the core a little drying tannin, uncomplicated and honest.''

James Suckling  ''Attractive black-cherry and orange-peel character follows through to a medium body, light tannins and a fruity finish."

Bruce Sanderson, Wine Specatator "A dusting of bittersweet chocolate coats the black cherry and blueberry fruit in this firmly structured red. Bitter almond and earth accents chime in on the dry finish. Best from 2021 through 2035

Andrea Briccarello, Andrew Jefford, Susan Hulme MW ''Seductive nose of violets, blueberry and plums, the simple sweet pleasures. A lively vitality to this wine and a long, persistent, perfumed finish.''

Luca Gardini "Dark fruit, a lot of blackberry and spice on the nose. Fruity again in the mouth, but also spicy due partly to the oak. A substantial savory sensation, which helps the drinkability. Long finish of licorice root."''.

International Wine & Spirit Competition ''lenty of wood spices and dried fruit. The palate has a sweet start, with some strawberries and cinnamon spice, and a nice savoury finish with refreshing acidity.''

Rocca delle Macìe was established in 1973, when film producer Italo Zingarelli – of Ettore Scola’s “We All Loved Each Other So Much” fame, and also the wildly popular series of films featuring comedy duo Bud Spencer and Terence Hill (including “They Call Me Trinity” and “Trinity Is Still My Name”) – decided to realize his lifelong dream by acquiring the “Le Macìe” estate – extending across 93 hectares (230 acres) in all, of which only two were under vine – in order to create a winery in the heart of the Chianti Classico zone.

The company estate now extends to more than 500 hectares (1250 acres) with, in total, more than 200 (500 acres) used as vineyards and 22 (54 acres) as olive groves, subdivided across the company’s six estates: Le Macìe, Sant’Alfonso, Fizzano e le Tavolelle in the Chianti Classico Area, in addition to the Campomaccione and Casa Maria estates in the Morellino di Scansano Area (Maremma).

The Chianti region in Italy's Tuscany wine growing region is split between Chianti and Chianti Classico. Accordingly, two separate DOCG designations apply to wines from the Chianti region: the Chianti Classico DOCG for the heartland of Chianti, and Chianti DOCG for all other Chianti regions. (In 1984, the Chianti region was promoted from DOC to DOCG - Italy’s highest classification - and in 1996, Chianti Classico - the historic heartland of the region - DOCG was created, which gave autonomy to that region. In the last 20 years, a consortium of Chianti Classico producers have researched new Sangiovese clones, replanted vineyards, updated cellar practices and generally made Chianti Classico DOCG a world-class appellation. Chianti Classico must contain a minimum of 75% Sangiovese. In the 2014 edition of its annual compendium of wine ratings, Gambero Rosso noted that Chianti Classico DOCG wines were noteworthy for their “significant return to a more defined style, true to tradition.” The typical Chianti Classico wine is a ruby-red, Sangiovese-based wine with aromas of violets and cherries and a hint of earthy spice.

The Chianti DOCG designation covers wines from six Chianti sub-zones (Colli Pisane, Colli Fiorentini, Colli Senesi, Colli Aretini, Montalbano and Rufina) as well as all other Chianti wines. The Chianti Classico DOCG is located in the very center of Tuscany, between Florence and Sienna.

Tuscany is Italy's third most planted region (behind Sicily and Apulia) but it is eighth in terms of output. After Piedmont and the Veneto, Tuscany produces the third-highest volume of DOC/DOCG wines. More than 80% of the regions' production is in red wine, with the Sangiovese grape being Tuscany's' most prominent grape. Trebbiano is the leading white variety of the region.

The history of viticulture in Tuscany dates back to the Etruscans in the 8th century BC. From the fall of the Roman Empire and throughout the Middle Ages, monasteries were the main purveyors of wines in the region. As the aristocratic and merchant classes emerged, they inherited the share-cropping system of agriculture known as mezzadria. Many Tuscan landowners would turn their half of the grape harvest into wine that would be sold to merchants in Florence. Following the end of the Napoleonic Wars, Tuscany returned to the rule of the Habsburgs. Chianti, Chianti Classico, Brunello di Montalcino, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano and Super Tuscan are Tuscany’s best known wines.

Sangiovese (or Nielluccio in Corsica), a dark-berried vine, is the most widely planted grape variety in Italy. Virtually synonymous with the red wines of Tuscany, and all the romanticism that goes with the territory, Sangiovese is the core constituent in some of the great names in Italian wine. Italy's love affair with Sangiovese – and indeed the world's – is generations old, though recent grapevine research suggests the variety is not as ancient as once thought.