Rocca Delle Macie Mixed 6 Pack Value
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Rocca Delle Macie Mixed 6 Pack Value
Rocca Delle Macie Mixed 6 Pack Value
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Rocca Delle Macie Mixed 6 Pack Value

Rocca Delle Macie Mixed 6 Pack Value

$255 $359
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This is Great……and Here’s Why!

This exclusive collection brings together a diverse selection of premium Italian wines from the renowned Rocca delle Macìe winery this 6-pack value set provides the perfect opportunity. Each bottle showcases the unique terroir and varietals of Italy's diverse wine regions, meticulously crafted by Rocca delle Macìe's expert winemakers. From rich and robust reds to crisp and refreshing whites, this mixed pack offers a comprehensive tasting experience of Italy's winemaking heritage.

1 x Rocca delle Macie Vernaiolo Chianti 2021 - Tuscany, Italy

90/100 James Suckling
90/100 James Suckling (2019 vintage)
91/100 James Suckling (2017 vintage)
90/100 James Suckling (2016 vintage)
91/100 James Suckling (2015 vintage)

Silver - Mundus Vini (2019 vintage)
1 Bicchiere - Vini d'Italia 2011 Gambero Rosso (2009 vintage)
Tre Grappoli - Duemilavini 2011 Associazione Italiana Sommelier (2009 vintage)

James Suckling ""Sweet-blackberry and orange-peel aromas with a medium to light body, fine tannins and a fresh finish.""

James Suckling ""Sweet cherries, minerals and some citrus on the nose and palate. Light body with no tannin impact and a delicious, creamy finish."" (2019 vintage)

James Suckling ""This is rich and delicious with black cherries and hints of milk chocolate. Medium body, light tannins and a crisp finish. "" (2017 vintage)

James Suckling ""A fruity red with lots of dried berries and hints of dried flowers. Medium body, round tannins and a medium finish. Delicious and fun."" (2016 vintage)

James Suckling ""Bright aromas of cherries with underbrush and hints of terracotta. Sharp and linear with delicate fruit throughout. Clean finish. Light and easy."" (2015 vintage)

Rocca delle Macìe was established in 1973, when film producer Italo Zingarelli – of Ettore Scola’s “We All Loved Each Other So Much” fame, and also the wildly popular series of films featuring comedy duo Bud Spencer and Terence Hill (including “They Call Me Trinity” and “Trinity Is Still My Name”) – decided to realize his lifelong dream by acquiring the “Le Macìe” estate – extending across 93 hectares (230 acres) in all, of which only two were under vine – in order to create a winery in the heart of the Chianti Classico zone.

The estate now extends to more than 500 hectares (1250 acres) with, in total, more than 200 (500 acres) used as vineyards and 22 (54 acres) as olive groves, subdivided across the company’s six estates: Le Macìe, Sant’Alfonso, Fizzano e le Tavolelle in the Chianti Classico Area, in addition to the Campomaccione and Casa Maria estates in the Morellino di Scansano Area (Maremma).

The Chianti region in Italy's Tuscany wine growing region is split between Chianti and Chianti Classico. Accordingly, two separate DOCG designations apply to wines from the Chianti region: the Chianti Classico DOCG for the heartland of Chianti, and Chianti DOCG for all other Chianti regions. (In 1984, the Chianti region was promoted from DOC to DOCG - Italy’s highest classification - and in 1996, Chianti Classico - the historic heartland of the region - DOCG was created, which gave autonomy to that region. In the last 20 years, a consortium of Chianti Classico producers have researched new Sangiovese clones, replanted vineyards, updated cellar practices and generally made Chianti Classico DOCG a world-class appellation. Chianti Classico must contain a minimum of 75% Sangiovese. In the 2014 edition of its annual compendium of wine ratings, Gambero Rosso noted that Chianti Classico DOCG wines were noteworthy for their “significant return to a more defined style, true to tradition.” The typical Chianti Classico wine is a ruby-red, Sangiovese-based wine with aromas of violets and cherries and a hint of earthy spice.

The Chianti DOCG designation covers wines from six Chianti sub-zones (Colli Pisane, Colli Fiorentini, Colli Senesi, Colli Aretini, Montalbano and Rufina) as well as all other Chianti wines. The Chianti Classico DOCG is located in the very center of Tuscany, between Florence and Sienna.

Sangiovese (or Nielluccio in Corsica), a dark-berried vine, is the most widely planted grape variety in Italy. Virtually synonymous with the red wines of Tuscany, and all the romanticism that goes with the territory, Sangiovese is the core constituent in some of the great names in Italian wine. Italy's love affair with Sangiovese – and indeed the world's – is generations old, though recent grapevine research suggests the variety is not as ancient as once thought.

1 x Vernaccia di San Gimignano 2021 - Tuscany, Italy

Bronze - Robert Parker, Wine Advocate (2012)
Bronze - Wine Spectator (2012)
Bronze - Wine Spectator (2011)
Bronze - Wine Enthusiast (2011)

3 Stars - Vini Buoni d'Italia (2011)

Wine Enthusiast Magazine ""This is the kind of easy Italian white that would taste delicious at an outdoor barbecue or on a hot afternoon. The wine is light, lean and loaded with fresh citrus flavors."" (2012 vintage)

Robert Parker, Wine Advocate ""Aromas include white peach and grapefruit pith. The natural crispness of the variety gives this wine extra pop on the otherwise mild finish."" (2012 vintage)

Wine Spectator ""The almond, straw, apple and melon flavors get a boost from the acidity and briny elements in this white. Offers a crisp and minerally finish."" (2011 vintage)

Wine Enthusiast Magazine ""bright vein of acidity that's backed by fragrant aromas of lemon zest, kiwi, green sage and grapefruit."" (2010 vintage)

Wine Enthusiast Magazine ""We love fresh, zesty Italian whites because they pair so well with the healthy, international cuisine offered on our menus. This expression is especially delicious with tonic aromas of chopped sage and stone fruit that build in momentum."" (1999 vintage)

Rocca delle Macìe was established in 1973, when film producer Italo Zingarelli – of Ettore Scola’s “We All Loved Each Other So Much” fame, and also the wildly popular series of films featuring comedy duo Bud Spencer and Terence Hill (including “They Call Me Trinity” and “Trinity Is Still My Name”) – decided to realize his lifelong dream by acquiring the “Le Macìe” estate – extending across 93 hectares (230 acres) in all, of which only two were under vine – in order to create a winery in the heart of the Chianti Classico zone.

The company estate now extends to more than 500 hectares (1250 acres) with, in total, more than 200 (500 acres) used as vineyards and 22 (54 acres) as olive groves, subdivided across the company’s six estates: Le Macìe, Sant’Alfonso, Fizzano e le Tavolelle in the Chianti Classico Area, in addition to the Campomaccione and Casa Maria estates in the Morellino di Scansano Area (Maremma).

The Chianti region in Italy's Tuscany wine growing region is split between Chianti and Chianti Classico. Accordingly, two separate DOCG designations apply to wines from the Chianti region: the Chianti Classico DOCG for the heartland of Chianti, and Chianti DOCG for all other Chianti regions. (In 1984, the Chianti region was promoted from DOC to DOCG - Italy’s highest classification - and in 1996, Chianti Classico - the historic heartland of the region - DOCG was created, which gave autonomy to that region. In the last 20 years, a consortium of Chianti Classico producers have researched new Sangiovese clones, replanted vineyards, updated cellar practices and generally made Chianti Classico DOCG a world-class appellation. Chianti Classico must contain a minimum of 75% Sangiovese. In the 2014 edition of its annual compendium of wine ratings, Gambero Rosso noted that Chianti Classico DOCG wines were noteworthy for their “significant return to a more defined style, true to tradition.” The typical Chianti Classico wine is a ruby-red, Sangiovese-based wine with aromas of violets and cherries and a hint of earthy spice.

The Chianti DOCG designation covers wines from six Chianti sub-zones (Colli Pisane, Colli Fiorentini, Colli Senesi, Colli Aretini, Montalbano and Rufina) as well as all other Chianti wines. The Chianti Classico DOCG is located in the very center of Tuscany, between Florence and Sienna.""

Vernaccia di San Gimignano is a wine served on the tables of popes and kings, it was the first DOC in Italy. Perfect to be combined with fish, white meats, cheeses. Vernaccia di San Gimignano comes to life in over 730 hectares of vineyards in the heart of Tuscany in a extraordinary land, rich in biodiversity.

1 x Rocca delle Macie Chianti Classico Famiglia Zingarelli 2020 - Tuscany, Italy

93/100 Luca Gardini
91/100 James Suckling
91/100 International Wine & Spirit Competition Panel Tasting
90/100 Falstaff Wein Guide Italien 2023 - Othmar Kiem, Simon Staffler
93+/100 Luca Gardini (2019)
92/100 James Suckling (2019)
Kermode,Wieteke Teppema, Luke Harbor (2019)
90/100 Othmar Kiem, Simon Staffler, Falstaff (2018)
91/100 James Suckling (2017)
92/100 James Suckling (2016)
91/100 Bruce Sanderson, Wine Specatator (2016
92/100 Luca Gardini (2014)
90/100 Andrea Briccarello, Andrew Jefford, Susan Hulme MW (2014)
Gold Medal /Best of Show - Mundus Vini (2019)
Gold Medal Mundus Vini (2018)
Bronze - IWSC (2017 vintage)

International Wine & Spirit Competition ""Refreshing and beautifully refined.....Dark, dense, and delectable with smooth, mouth-coating tannins, ripe red cherry, baked strawberry, bilberry and smoked meat.''

Luca Gardini ""From one of the most recognisable labels of this denomination, a blend of Sangiovese and Merlot marked by a nice aromatic and gustatory profile. Notes of raspberry to the nose, followed by rhubarb and wild iris nuances. 93+ Iodine tannins on the palate, persistence and freshness.''

James Suckling 'Aromas of dried strawberries, orange zest, stones and licorice, followed by a medium body with firm tannins rounding off the savory berry fruit.''

Falstaff Wein Guide Italien 2023 - Othmar Kiem, Simon Staffler ''Brilliant ruby with garnet glints. In the nose there's nuances of fresh cherries with a slightly savoury note emerging. Very juicy and mouth-filling on the palate, with fine-grained tannins and a medium-long finish.''

Luca Gardini ''In the Classico dedicated to the founder also all the crispness of Rocca delle Macìe grapes. The nose reveals notes of raspberry, then nutmeg and marjoram, ending of balsamic hints....fruity, crisp, with brackish 93+ tannins closing of a small red fruits taste.''

Falstaff - Othmar Kiem, Simon Staffler ''Bright ruby with a fine garnet edge. Very fragrant nose, fine cherry and some raspberry. On the palate much grip, in the core a little drying tannin, uncomplicated and honest.''

James Suckling, ''Attractive black-cherry and orange-peel character follows through to a medium body, light tannins and a fruity finish.""

Bruce Sanderson, Wine Specatator,''A dusting of bittersweet chocolate coats the black cherry and blueberry fruit in this firmly structured red. Bitter almond and earth accents chime in on the dry finish. Best from 2021 through 2035

Andrea Briccarello, Andrew Jefford, Susan Hulme MW, ''Seductive nose of violets, blueberry and plums, the simple sweet pleasures. A lively vitality to this wine and a long, persistent, perfumed finish.''

Luca Gardini, ""Dark fruit, a lot of blackberry and spice on the nose. Fruity again in the mouth, but also spicy due partly to the oak. A substantial savory sensation, which helps the drinkability. Long finish of licorice root.""''.

International Wine & Spirit Competition, ''lenty of wood spices and dried fruit. The palate has a sweet start, with some strawberries and cinnamon spice, and a nice savoury finish with refreshing acidity.''

Rocca delle Macìe was established in 1973, when film producer Italo Zingarelli – of Ettore Scola’s “We All Loved Each Other So Much” fame, and also the wildly popular series of films featuring comedy duo Bud Spencer and Terence Hill (including “They Call Me Trinity” and “Trinity Is Still My Name”) – decided to realize his lifelong dream by acquiring the “Le Macìe” estate – extending across 93 hectares (230 acres) in all, of which only two were under vine – in order to create a winery in the heart of the Chianti Classico zone.

The company estate now extends to more than 500 hectares (1250 acres) with, in total, more than 200 (500 acres) used as vineyards and 22 (54 acres) as olive groves, subdivided across the company’s six estates: Le Macìe, Sant’Alfonso, Fizzano e le Tavolelle in the Chianti Classico Area, in addition to the Campomaccione and Casa Maria estates in the Morellino di Scansano Area (Maremma).

The Chianti region in Italy's Tuscany wine growing region is split between Chianti and Chianti Classico. Accordingly, two separate DOCG designations apply to wines from the Chianti region: the Chianti Classico DOCG for the heartland of Chianti, and Chianti DOCG for all other Chianti regions. (In 1984, the Chianti region was promoted from DOC to DOCG - Italy’s highest classification - and in 1996, Chianti Classico - the historic heartland of the region - DOCG was created, which gave autonomy to that region. In the last 20 years, a consortium of Chianti Classico producers have researched new Sangiovese clones, replanted vineyards, updated cellar practices and generally made Chianti Classico DOCG a world-class appellation. Chianti Classico must contain a minimum of 75% Sangiovese. In the 2014 edition of its annual compendium of wine ratings, Gambero Rosso noted that Chianti Classico DOCG wines were noteworthy for their “significant return to a more defined style, true to tradition.” The typical Chianti Classico wine is a ruby-red, Sangiovese-based wine with aromas of violets and cherries and a hint of earthy spice.

The Chianti DOCG designation covers wines from six Chianti sub-zones (Colli Pisane, Colli Fiorentini, Colli Senesi, Colli Aretini, Montalbano and Rufina) as well as all other Chianti wines. The Chianti Classico DOCG is located in the very center of Tuscany, between Florence and Sienna.

Tuscany is Italy's third most planted region (behind Sicily and Apulia) but it is eighth in terms of output. After Piedmont and the Veneto, Tuscany produces the third-highest volume of DOC/DOCG wines. More than 80% of the regions' production is in red wine, with the Sangiovese grape being Tuscany's' most prominent grape. Trebbiano is the leading white variety of the region.

The history of viticulture in Tuscany dates back to the Etruscans in the 8th century BC. From the fall of the Roman Empire and throughout the Middle Ages, monasteries were the main purveyors of wines in the region. As the aristocratic and merchant classes emerged, they inherited the share-cropping system of agriculture known as mezzadria. Many Tuscan landowners would turn their half of the grape harvest into wine that would be sold to merchants in Florence. Following the end of the Napoleonic Wars, Tuscany returned to the rule of the Habsburgs. Chianti, Chianti Classico, Brunello di Montalcino, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano and Super Tuscan are Tuscany’s best known wines.

Sangiovese (or Nielluccio in Corsica), a dark-berried vine, is the most widely planted grape variety in Italy. Virtually synonymous with the red wines of Tuscany, and all the romanticism that goes with the territory, Sangiovese is the core constituent in some of the great names in Italian wine. Italy's love affair with Sangiovese – and indeed the world's – is generations old, though recent grapevine research suggests the variety is not as ancient as once thought.

2 x Campo Maccione Vermentino 2022 - Tuscany, Italy

92/100 Wine Enthusiast
90/100 James Suckling
90/100 Falstaff

92/100 Michael Apstein (2021 vintage)
91/100 James Suckling (2021 vintage)
90/100 Falstaff (2021 vintage)
90/100 Wine Enthusiast (2021 vintage)
90/100 Raffaela Vecchione, Wine Critic
Bronze - Rober Parker, Wine Advocate (2021 vintage)

Gold - Mundus Vini

Organic - currently undergoing certification

Wine Enthusiast ""A nose that's heady and sweet in an indulgent way, with grapefruit candy, green apple, almond and honey, opens for a palate that reiterates these flavors.""

James Suckling ""Aromatic, with a toasted-grain character to the ripe pear and lemon fruit. Medium-bodied with the same savory character taking center-stage, but the fruit is ever-present, too. A light phenolic touch along the way. An interesting take on Tuscan vermentino.""

Falstaff ""Pale straw yellow with silver highlights. On the nose yellow peach and sliced apple, reverberating on culinary herbs. On the palate a creamy texture, fresh acidity and fruit-driven course, persistent.""

Michael Apstein ""To capture the crisp clean character of this wine, Rocca delle Macìe harvests the grapes early in the morning, when it is cool. Then, they are kept on dry ice until they reach the winery where a cold fermentation occurs in stainless tanks. Excellent depth balances its cutting edginess. A saline-tinged minerality in the finish just adds to its enjoyment. A terrific value!"" (2021 vintage)

James Suckling ""Freshly cut lime and seashell in the nose. Medium to full body, layers of fruit and a bitter-lemon and pear aftertaste. Delicious."" (2021 vintage)

Falstaff ""Pale straw yellow with greenish reflections. Intense and fragrant nose of elderflower, lemon and acacia, reverberating with hints of Mediterranean scrub and almonds. On the palate it is salty and clear, filigree, with a long finish."" (2021 vintage)

Raffaela Vecchione, Wine Critic ""Of medium sensory intensity, it offers notes of geraniums, hawthorn, and linden flowers. Medium to full-bodied, with a solid and compact structure, and a spicy finish."" (2021 vintage)

Wine Enthusiast ""Fresh grass, stone, citrus and the peppery herbaceousness of new olive oil show on the nose of this Vermentino. The wine remains savory on the palate with brine and stones but also toasted nuts, tahini and shortbread. These contrast with the bright acidic pop of lemon juice alongside rich lemon curd."" (2021 vintage)

Rober Parker, Wine Advocate ""...is easy-drinking and bright. It offers a lean and short performance with lemon, crushed chalk and dried grass."" (2021 vintage)

Alcohol: 13%

Rocca delle Macìe was established in 1973, when film producer Italo Zingarelli – of Ettore Scola’s “We All Loved Each Other So Much” fame, and also the wildly popular series of films featuring comedy duo Bud Spencer and Terence Hill (including “They Call Me Trinity” and “Trinity Is Still My Name”) – decided to realize his lifelong dream by acquiring the “Le Macìe” estate – extending across 93 hectares (230 acres) in all, of which only two were under vine – in order to create a winery in the heart of the Chianti Classico zone.

Enjoy this wine made on the Zingarelli family’s Maremma estates. Morellino di Scansano takes center-stage but has been complemented over the years by white and rosé wines bearing the recently created Maremma DOC denomination, along with Typical Geographical Indication (IGT) wines in a more modern style that nevertheless respects the Tuscan tradition.

Vermentino (“vur-men-teeno”) is a light-bodied white wine that grows mostly in Italy on the island of Sardinia. What’s exciting about Vermentino is it can be deliciously complex in taste in similar style to Sauvignon Blanc; One style is richer and creamier and the other is lighter, more floral and zestier. Because Vermentino is so unknown, you can find high quality wines for a great value. Wines with similar body and taste profile include Albariño, Grüner Veltliner, Sauvignon Blanc, Sémillon, Soave and Verdejo.
Despite the typical light-bodied character of Vermentino, it’s actually quite complex to taste. A glass of classic Sardinia Vermentino will offer up lively aromas of pear, white peach, lime and pink grapefruit with subtle notes of crushed rocks and citrus zest. On the palate, Vermentino is almost always dry and somewhat oily with flavors of grapefruit and citrus, with a crushed rocky minerality and saltiness. On the finish, it can be a bit snappy with bitterness similar to the taste of grapefruit pith or, if it’s on the riper side, fresh almond.
In Provence, Vermentino is called Rolle (“roll”). It’s the secret ingredient to the region’s top-rated Rosé.

The Chianti region in Italy's Tuscany wine growing region is split between Chianti and Chianti Classico. Accordingly, two separate DOCG designations apply to wines from the Chianti region: the Chianti Classico DOCG for the heartland of Chianti, and Chianti DOCG for all other Chianti regions. (In 1984, the Chianti region was promoted from DOC to DOCG - Italy’s highest classification - and in 1996, Chianti Classico - the historic heartland of the region - DOCG was created, which gave autonomy to that region. In the last 20 years, a consortium of Chianti Classico producers have researched new Sangiovese clones, replanted vineyards, updated cellar practices and generally made Chianti Classico DOCG a world-class appellation. Chianti Classico must contain a minimum of 75% Sangiovese. In the 2014 edition of its annual compendium of wine ratings, Gambero Rosso noted that Chianti Classico DOCG wines were noteworthy for their “significant return to a more defined style, true to tradition.” The typical Chianti Classico wine is a ruby-red, Sangiovese-based wine with aromas of violets and cherries and a hint of earthy spice.

The Chianti DOCG designation covers wines from six Chianti sub-zones (Colli Pisane, Colli Fiorentini, Colli Senesi, Colli Aretini, Montalbano and Rufina) as well as all other Chianti wines. The Chianti Classico DOCG is located in the very center of Tuscany, between Florence and Sienna.

1 x Pietra Pura Hyria Primitivo Puglia 2020 - Puglia, Italy

Winemaker ""An intense bouquet of red fruits which burst through to the palate. Rich and smooth, with a wellbalanced finish.

Wimemaker ""Rocca delle Macìe has combined experience and expertise to create three different types of wine using Primitivo and Negroamaro grapes, which are vinified and bottled in the Puglia Region, under the watchful eye of the Zingarelli family’s chief winemaker, Luca Francioni. The Primitivo grapes of this wine come from selected vineyards located in southern Puglia, where the traditional Alberello basso vine training method is employed.""

Vinum ""An intense bouquet of red fruits, persistent with hints of blackcurrant and wild berries and lightly spiced thyme and aromatic herbs. Rich and smooth, with good body and a well balanced and persistent finish. 30% of the wine is aged in barriques for 12 months and 70% for the same period in stainless steel.
Ideal with meat, game or seasoned cheeses.

100% Primitivo

The PietraPura range is a successful collaboration with famous winery group, Rocca delle Macìe which makes the most of the native vines of the Salento area to create wines that express the very best of the terroir. Rocca delle Macìe has combined experience and expertise to create three different types of wine using Primitivo and Negroamaro grapes. Mandus and Cotis, two expressions of Primitivo di Manduria DOC, Dolceluna – Primitivo Dolce Naturale DOCG- and Negramaro -Salento IGT- represent the high end of the range and are produced using grapes cultivated in vineyards selected by Rocca delle Macìe’s technicians. The grapes are then vinified and bottled in the Puglia Region, under the watchful eye of the Zingarelli family’s chief winemaker, Luca Francioni.

Rocca delle Macìe was established in 1973, when Italo Zingarelli – producer of Ettore Scola’s “We All Loved Each Other So Much”, and also of the wildly popular series of films featuring comedy duo Bud Spencer and Terence Hill (including “They Call Me Trinity” and “Trinity Is Still My Name”) – decided to realize his lifelong dream by acquiring the “Le Macìe” estate – extending across 93 hectares (230 acres) in all, of which only two were under vine – in order to create a winery in the heart of the Chianti Classico zone.

Rocca delle Macìe was established in 1973, when film producer Italo Zingarelli – of Ettore Scola’s “We All Loved Each Other So Much” fame, and also the wildly popular series of films featuring comedy duo Bud Spencer and Terence Hill (including “They Call Me Trinity” and “Trinity Is Still My Name”) – decided to realize his lifelong dream by acquiring the “Le Macìe” estate – extending across 93 hectares (230 acres) in all, of which only two were under vine – in order to create a winery in the heart of the Chianti Classico zone.

Puglia, also known as Apulia, is a long, narrow region comprising the heel of southern Italy's boot. Puglia is a major producer of both wine grapes and table grapes. Its name comes from a-pulvia, or “lack of rain” in Roman. The terroir is influenced by a sunny, warm Mediterranean climate with breezes from the Adriatic sea and fertile soil rich in limestone. The Puglian wine region is divided into three subregions: Foggia in the north, Bari and Taranto in the center, and Brindisi and Lecce in the south.

After Veneto, Puglia is tied with Sicily as the second biggest wine region in Italy. The Puglia area is mostly home to grape growers, rather than wine producers. However, there are winemakers producing quality wines in Puglia in smaller quantities. In addition to grapes, Puglia produces 40 percent of Italy's olive oil.

The grape of most interest to non-Italians is the early-ripening Primitivo, a speciality of the Gioia del Colle plain just south of Bari and Manduria, the western coast of the heel just south of Taranto. DNA analysis has proved what many had suspected all along, that this vine variety is one and the same as California's Zinfandel.

Primitivo is a dark-skinned grape known for producing inky, tannic wines, particularly Primitivo di Manduria and its naturally sweet Dolce Naturale variant. Although there have been contentious and long-running debates about the variety's geographical origins, there is little question that Primitivo's modern-day home is in southern Italy, particularly Puglia.

This exclusive collection brings together a diverse selection of premium Italian wines from the renowned Rocca delle Macìe winery this 6-pack value set provides the perfect opportunity. Each bottle showcases the unique terroir and varietals of Italy's diverse wine regions, meticulously crafted by Rocca delle Macìe's expert winemakers. From rich and robust reds to crisp and refreshing whites, this mixed pack offers a comprehensive tasting experience of Italy's winemaking heritage.

1 x Rocca delle Macie Vernaiolo Chianti 2021 - Tuscany, Italy

90/100 James Suckling
90/100 James Suckling (2019 vintage)
91/100 James Suckling (2017 vintage)
90/100 James Suckling (2016 vintage)
91/100 James Suckling (2015 vintage)

Silver - Mundus Vini (2019 vintage)
1 Bicchiere - Vini d'Italia 2011 Gambero Rosso (2009 vintage)
Tre Grappoli - Duemilavini 2011 Associazione Italiana Sommelier (2009 vintage)

James Suckling ""Sweet-blackberry and orange-peel aromas with a medium to light body, fine tannins and a fresh finish.""

James Suckling ""Sweet cherries, minerals and some citrus on the nose and palate. Light body with no tannin impact and a delicious, creamy finish."" (2019 vintage)

James Suckling ""This is rich and delicious with black cherries and hints of milk chocolate. Medium body, light tannins and a crisp finish. "" (2017 vintage)

James Suckling ""A fruity red with lots of dried berries and hints of dried flowers. Medium body, round tannins and a medium finish. Delicious and fun."" (2016 vintage)

James Suckling ""Bright aromas of cherries with underbrush and hints of terracotta. Sharp and linear with delicate fruit throughout. Clean finish. Light and easy."" (2015 vintage)

Rocca delle Macìe was established in 1973, when film producer Italo Zingarelli – of Ettore Scola’s “We All Loved Each Other So Much” fame, and also the wildly popular series of films featuring comedy duo Bud Spencer and Terence Hill (including “They Call Me Trinity” and “Trinity Is Still My Name”) – decided to realize his lifelong dream by acquiring the “Le Macìe” estate – extending across 93 hectares (230 acres) in all, of which only two were under vine – in order to create a winery in the heart of the Chianti Classico zone.

The estate now extends to more than 500 hectares (1250 acres) with, in total, more than 200 (500 acres) used as vineyards and 22 (54 acres) as olive groves, subdivided across the company’s six estates: Le Macìe, Sant’Alfonso, Fizzano e le Tavolelle in the Chianti Classico Area, in addition to the Campomaccione and Casa Maria estates in the Morellino di Scansano Area (Maremma).

The Chianti region in Italy's Tuscany wine growing region is split between Chianti and Chianti Classico. Accordingly, two separate DOCG designations apply to wines from the Chianti region: the Chianti Classico DOCG for the heartland of Chianti, and Chianti DOCG for all other Chianti regions. (In 1984, the Chianti region was promoted from DOC to DOCG - Italy’s highest classification - and in 1996, Chianti Classico - the historic heartland of the region - DOCG was created, which gave autonomy to that region. In the last 20 years, a consortium of Chianti Classico producers have researched new Sangiovese clones, replanted vineyards, updated cellar practices and generally made Chianti Classico DOCG a world-class appellation. Chianti Classico must contain a minimum of 75% Sangiovese. In the 2014 edition of its annual compendium of wine ratings, Gambero Rosso noted that Chianti Classico DOCG wines were noteworthy for their “significant return to a more defined style, true to tradition.” The typical Chianti Classico wine is a ruby-red, Sangiovese-based wine with aromas of violets and cherries and a hint of earthy spice.

The Chianti DOCG designation covers wines from six Chianti sub-zones (Colli Pisane, Colli Fiorentini, Colli Senesi, Colli Aretini, Montalbano and Rufina) as well as all other Chianti wines. The Chianti Classico DOCG is located in the very center of Tuscany, between Florence and Sienna.

Sangiovese (or Nielluccio in Corsica), a dark-berried vine, is the most widely planted grape variety in Italy. Virtually synonymous with the red wines of Tuscany, and all the romanticism that goes with the territory, Sangiovese is the core constituent in some of the great names in Italian wine. Italy's love affair with Sangiovese – and indeed the world's – is generations old, though recent grapevine research suggests the variety is not as ancient as once thought.

1 x Vernaccia di San Gimignano 2021 - Tuscany, Italy

Bronze - Robert Parker, Wine Advocate (2012)
Bronze - Wine Spectator (2012)
Bronze - Wine Spectator (2011)
Bronze - Wine Enthusiast (2011)

3 Stars - Vini Buoni d'Italia (2011)

Wine Enthusiast Magazine ""This is the kind of easy Italian white that would taste delicious at an outdoor barbecue or on a hot afternoon. The wine is light, lean and loaded with fresh citrus flavors."" (2012 vintage)

Robert Parker, Wine Advocate ""Aromas include white peach and grapefruit pith. The natural crispness of the variety gives this wine extra pop on the otherwise mild finish."" (2012 vintage)

Wine Spectator ""The almond, straw, apple and melon flavors get a boost from the acidity and briny elements in this white. Offers a crisp and minerally finish."" (2011 vintage)

Wine Enthusiast Magazine ""bright vein of acidity that's backed by fragrant aromas of lemon zest, kiwi, green sage and grapefruit."" (2010 vintage)

Wine Enthusiast Magazine ""We love fresh, zesty Italian whites because they pair so well with the healthy, international cuisine offered on our menus. This expression is especially delicious with tonic aromas of chopped sage and stone fruit that build in momentum."" (1999 vintage)

Rocca delle Macìe was established in 1973, when film producer Italo Zingarelli – of Ettore Scola’s “We All Loved Each Other So Much” fame, and also the wildly popular series of films featuring comedy duo Bud Spencer and Terence Hill (including “They Call Me Trinity” and “Trinity Is Still My Name”) – decided to realize his lifelong dream by acquiring the “Le Macìe” estate – extending across 93 hectares (230 acres) in all, of which only two were under vine – in order to create a winery in the heart of the Chianti Classico zone.

The company estate now extends to more than 500 hectares (1250 acres) with, in total, more than 200 (500 acres) used as vineyards and 22 (54 acres) as olive groves, subdivided across the company’s six estates: Le Macìe, Sant’Alfonso, Fizzano e le Tavolelle in the Chianti Classico Area, in addition to the Campomaccione and Casa Maria estates in the Morellino di Scansano Area (Maremma).

The Chianti region in Italy's Tuscany wine growing region is split between Chianti and Chianti Classico. Accordingly, two separate DOCG designations apply to wines from the Chianti region: the Chianti Classico DOCG for the heartland of Chianti, and Chianti DOCG for all other Chianti regions. (In 1984, the Chianti region was promoted from DOC to DOCG - Italy’s highest classification - and in 1996, Chianti Classico - the historic heartland of the region - DOCG was created, which gave autonomy to that region. In the last 20 years, a consortium of Chianti Classico producers have researched new Sangiovese clones, replanted vineyards, updated cellar practices and generally made Chianti Classico DOCG a world-class appellation. Chianti Classico must contain a minimum of 75% Sangiovese. In the 2014 edition of its annual compendium of wine ratings, Gambero Rosso noted that Chianti Classico DOCG wines were noteworthy for their “significant return to a more defined style, true to tradition.” The typical Chianti Classico wine is a ruby-red, Sangiovese-based wine with aromas of violets and cherries and a hint of earthy spice.

The Chianti DOCG designation covers wines from six Chianti sub-zones (Colli Pisane, Colli Fiorentini, Colli Senesi, Colli Aretini, Montalbano and Rufina) as well as all other Chianti wines. The Chianti Classico DOCG is located in the very center of Tuscany, between Florence and Sienna.""

Vernaccia di San Gimignano is a wine served on the tables of popes and kings, it was the first DOC in Italy. Perfect to be combined with fish, white meats, cheeses. Vernaccia di San Gimignano comes to life in over 730 hectares of vineyards in the heart of Tuscany in a extraordinary land, rich in biodiversity.

1 x Rocca delle Macie Chianti Classico Famiglia Zingarelli 2020 - Tuscany, Italy

93/100 Luca Gardini
91/100 James Suckling
91/100 International Wine & Spirit Competition Panel Tasting
90/100 Falstaff Wein Guide Italien 2023 - Othmar Kiem, Simon Staffler
93+/100 Luca Gardini (2019)
92/100 James Suckling (2019)
Kermode,Wieteke Teppema, Luke Harbor (2019)
90/100 Othmar Kiem, Simon Staffler, Falstaff (2018)
91/100 James Suckling (2017)
92/100 James Suckling (2016)
91/100 Bruce Sanderson, Wine Specatator (2016
92/100 Luca Gardini (2014)
90/100 Andrea Briccarello, Andrew Jefford, Susan Hulme MW (2014)
Gold Medal /Best of Show - Mundus Vini (2019)
Gold Medal Mundus Vini (2018)
Bronze - IWSC (2017 vintage)

International Wine & Spirit Competition ""Refreshing and beautifully refined.....Dark, dense, and delectable with smooth, mouth-coating tannins, ripe red cherry, baked strawberry, bilberry and smoked meat.''

Luca Gardini ""From one of the most recognisable labels of this denomination, a blend of Sangiovese and Merlot marked by a nice aromatic and gustatory profile. Notes of raspberry to the nose, followed by rhubarb and wild iris nuances. 93+ Iodine tannins on the palate, persistence and freshness.''

James Suckling 'Aromas of dried strawberries, orange zest, stones and licorice, followed by a medium body with firm tannins rounding off the savory berry fruit.''

Falstaff Wein Guide Italien 2023 - Othmar Kiem, Simon Staffler ''Brilliant ruby with garnet glints. In the nose there's nuances of fresh cherries with a slightly savoury note emerging. Very juicy and mouth-filling on the palate, with fine-grained tannins and a medium-long finish.''

Luca Gardini ''In the Classico dedicated to the founder also all the crispness of Rocca delle Macìe grapes. The nose reveals notes of raspberry, then nutmeg and marjoram, ending of balsamic hints....fruity, crisp, with brackish 93+ tannins closing of a small red fruits taste.''

Falstaff - Othmar Kiem, Simon Staffler ''Bright ruby with a fine garnet edge. Very fragrant nose, fine cherry and some raspberry. On the palate much grip, in the core a little drying tannin, uncomplicated and honest.''

James Suckling, ''Attractive black-cherry and orange-peel character follows through to a medium body, light tannins and a fruity finish.""

Bruce Sanderson, Wine Specatator,''A dusting of bittersweet chocolate coats the black cherry and blueberry fruit in this firmly structured red. Bitter almond and earth accents chime in on the dry finish. Best from 2021 through 2035

Andrea Briccarello, Andrew Jefford, Susan Hulme MW, ''Seductive nose of violets, blueberry and plums, the simple sweet pleasures. A lively vitality to this wine and a long, persistent, perfumed finish.''

Luca Gardini, ""Dark fruit, a lot of blackberry and spice on the nose. Fruity again in the mouth, but also spicy due partly to the oak. A substantial savory sensation, which helps the drinkability. Long finish of licorice root.""''.

International Wine & Spirit Competition, ''lenty of wood spices and dried fruit. The palate has a sweet start, with some strawberries and cinnamon spice, and a nice savoury finish with refreshing acidity.''

Rocca delle Macìe was established in 1973, when film producer Italo Zingarelli – of Ettore Scola’s “We All Loved Each Other So Much” fame, and also the wildly popular series of films featuring comedy duo Bud Spencer and Terence Hill (including “They Call Me Trinity” and “Trinity Is Still My Name”) – decided to realize his lifelong dream by acquiring the “Le Macìe” estate – extending across 93 hectares (230 acres) in all, of which only two were under vine – in order to create a winery in the heart of the Chianti Classico zone.

The company estate now extends to more than 500 hectares (1250 acres) with, in total, more than 200 (500 acres) used as vineyards and 22 (54 acres) as olive groves, subdivided across the company’s six estates: Le Macìe, Sant’Alfonso, Fizzano e le Tavolelle in the Chianti Classico Area, in addition to the Campomaccione and Casa Maria estates in the Morellino di Scansano Area (Maremma).

The Chianti region in Italy's Tuscany wine growing region is split between Chianti and Chianti Classico. Accordingly, two separate DOCG designations apply to wines from the Chianti region: the Chianti Classico DOCG for the heartland of Chianti, and Chianti DOCG for all other Chianti regions. (In 1984, the Chianti region was promoted from DOC to DOCG - Italy’s highest classification - and in 1996, Chianti Classico - the historic heartland of the region - DOCG was created, which gave autonomy to that region. In the last 20 years, a consortium of Chianti Classico producers have researched new Sangiovese clones, replanted vineyards, updated cellar practices and generally made Chianti Classico DOCG a world-class appellation. Chianti Classico must contain a minimum of 75% Sangiovese. In the 2014 edition of its annual compendium of wine ratings, Gambero Rosso noted that Chianti Classico DOCG wines were noteworthy for their “significant return to a more defined style, true to tradition.” The typical Chianti Classico wine is a ruby-red, Sangiovese-based wine with aromas of violets and cherries and a hint of earthy spice.

The Chianti DOCG designation covers wines from six Chianti sub-zones (Colli Pisane, Colli Fiorentini, Colli Senesi, Colli Aretini, Montalbano and Rufina) as well as all other Chianti wines. The Chianti Classico DOCG is located in the very center of Tuscany, between Florence and Sienna.

Tuscany is Italy's third most planted region (behind Sicily and Apulia) but it is eighth in terms of output. After Piedmont and the Veneto, Tuscany produces the third-highest volume of DOC/DOCG wines. More than 80% of the regions' production is in red wine, with the Sangiovese grape being Tuscany's' most prominent grape. Trebbiano is the leading white variety of the region.

The history of viticulture in Tuscany dates back to the Etruscans in the 8th century BC. From the fall of the Roman Empire and throughout the Middle Ages, monasteries were the main purveyors of wines in the region. As the aristocratic and merchant classes emerged, they inherited the share-cropping system of agriculture known as mezzadria. Many Tuscan landowners would turn their half of the grape harvest into wine that would be sold to merchants in Florence. Following the end of the Napoleonic Wars, Tuscany returned to the rule of the Habsburgs. Chianti, Chianti Classico, Brunello di Montalcino, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano and Super Tuscan are Tuscany’s best known wines.

Sangiovese (or Nielluccio in Corsica), a dark-berried vine, is the most widely planted grape variety in Italy. Virtually synonymous with the red wines of Tuscany, and all the romanticism that goes with the territory, Sangiovese is the core constituent in some of the great names in Italian wine. Italy's love affair with Sangiovese – and indeed the world's – is generations old, though recent grapevine research suggests the variety is not as ancient as once thought.

2 x Campo Maccione Vermentino 2022 - Tuscany, Italy

92/100 Wine Enthusiast
90/100 James Suckling
90/100 Falstaff

92/100 Michael Apstein (2021 vintage)
91/100 James Suckling (2021 vintage)
90/100 Falstaff (2021 vintage)
90/100 Wine Enthusiast (2021 vintage)
90/100 Raffaela Vecchione, Wine Critic
Bronze - Rober Parker, Wine Advocate (2021 vintage)

Gold - Mundus Vini

Organic - currently undergoing certification

Wine Enthusiast ""A nose that's heady and sweet in an indulgent way, with grapefruit candy, green apple, almond and honey, opens for a palate that reiterates these flavors.""

James Suckling ""Aromatic, with a toasted-grain character to the ripe pear and lemon fruit. Medium-bodied with the same savory character taking center-stage, but the fruit is ever-present, too. A light phenolic touch along the way. An interesting take on Tuscan vermentino.""

Falstaff ""Pale straw yellow with silver highlights. On the nose yellow peach and sliced apple, reverberating on culinary herbs. On the palate a creamy texture, fresh acidity and fruit-driven course, persistent.""

Michael Apstein ""To capture the crisp clean character of this wine, Rocca delle Macìe harvests the grapes early in the morning, when it is cool. Then, they are kept on dry ice until they reach the winery where a cold fermentation occurs in stainless tanks. Excellent depth balances its cutting edginess. A saline-tinged minerality in the finish just adds to its enjoyment. A terrific value!"" (2021 vintage)

James Suckling ""Freshly cut lime and seashell in the nose. Medium to full body, layers of fruit and a bitter-lemon and pear aftertaste. Delicious."" (2021 vintage)

Falstaff ""Pale straw yellow with greenish reflections. Intense and fragrant nose of elderflower, lemon and acacia, reverberating with hints of Mediterranean scrub and almonds. On the palate it is salty and clear, filigree, with a long finish."" (2021 vintage)

Raffaela Vecchione, Wine Critic ""Of medium sensory intensity, it offers notes of geraniums, hawthorn, and linden flowers. Medium to full-bodied, with a solid and compact structure, and a spicy finish."" (2021 vintage)

Wine Enthusiast ""Fresh grass, stone, citrus and the peppery herbaceousness of new olive oil show on the nose of this Vermentino. The wine remains savory on the palate with brine and stones but also toasted nuts, tahini and shortbread. These contrast with the bright acidic pop of lemon juice alongside rich lemon curd."" (2021 vintage)

Rober Parker, Wine Advocate ""...is easy-drinking and bright. It offers a lean and short performance with lemon, crushed chalk and dried grass."" (2021 vintage)

Alcohol: 13%

Rocca delle Macìe was established in 1973, when film producer Italo Zingarelli – of Ettore Scola’s “We All Loved Each Other So Much” fame, and also the wildly popular series of films featuring comedy duo Bud Spencer and Terence Hill (including “They Call Me Trinity” and “Trinity Is Still My Name”) – decided to realize his lifelong dream by acquiring the “Le Macìe” estate – extending across 93 hectares (230 acres) in all, of which only two were under vine – in order to create a winery in the heart of the Chianti Classico zone.

Enjoy this wine made on the Zingarelli family’s Maremma estates. Morellino di Scansano takes center-stage but has been complemented over the years by white and rosé wines bearing the recently created Maremma DOC denomination, along with Typical Geographical Indication (IGT) wines in a more modern style that nevertheless respects the Tuscan tradition.

Vermentino (“vur-men-teeno”) is a light-bodied white wine that grows mostly in Italy on the island of Sardinia. What’s exciting about Vermentino is it can be deliciously complex in taste in similar style to Sauvignon Blanc; One style is richer and creamier and the other is lighter, more floral and zestier. Because Vermentino is so unknown, you can find high quality wines for a great value. Wines with similar body and taste profile include Albariño, Grüner Veltliner, Sauvignon Blanc, Sémillon, Soave and Verdejo.
Despite the typical light-bodied character of Vermentino, it’s actually quite complex to taste. A glass of classic Sardinia Vermentino will offer up lively aromas of pear, white peach, lime and pink grapefruit with subtle notes of crushed rocks and citrus zest. On the palate, Vermentino is almost always dry and somewhat oily with flavors of grapefruit and citrus, with a crushed rocky minerality and saltiness. On the finish, it can be a bit snappy with bitterness similar to the taste of grapefruit pith or, if it’s on the riper side, fresh almond.
In Provence, Vermentino is called Rolle (“roll”). It’s the secret ingredient to the region’s top-rated Rosé.

The Chianti region in Italy's Tuscany wine growing region is split between Chianti and Chianti Classico. Accordingly, two separate DOCG designations apply to wines from the Chianti region: the Chianti Classico DOCG for the heartland of Chianti, and Chianti DOCG for all other Chianti regions. (In 1984, the Chianti region was promoted from DOC to DOCG - Italy’s highest classification - and in 1996, Chianti Classico - the historic heartland of the region - DOCG was created, which gave autonomy to that region. In the last 20 years, a consortium of Chianti Classico producers have researched new Sangiovese clones, replanted vineyards, updated cellar practices and generally made Chianti Classico DOCG a world-class appellation. Chianti Classico must contain a minimum of 75% Sangiovese. In the 2014 edition of its annual compendium of wine ratings, Gambero Rosso noted that Chianti Classico DOCG wines were noteworthy for their “significant return to a more defined style, true to tradition.” The typical Chianti Classico wine is a ruby-red, Sangiovese-based wine with aromas of violets and cherries and a hint of earthy spice.

The Chianti DOCG designation covers wines from six Chianti sub-zones (Colli Pisane, Colli Fiorentini, Colli Senesi, Colli Aretini, Montalbano and Rufina) as well as all other Chianti wines. The Chianti Classico DOCG is located in the very center of Tuscany, between Florence and Sienna.

1 x Pietra Pura Hyria Primitivo Puglia 2020 - Puglia, Italy

Winemaker ""An intense bouquet of red fruits which burst through to the palate. Rich and smooth, with a wellbalanced finish.

Wimemaker ""Rocca delle Macìe has combined experience and expertise to create three different types of wine using Primitivo and Negroamaro grapes, which are vinified and bottled in the Puglia Region, under the watchful eye of the Zingarelli family’s chief winemaker, Luca Francioni. The Primitivo grapes of this wine come from selected vineyards located in southern Puglia, where the traditional Alberello basso vine training method is employed.""

Vinum ""An intense bouquet of red fruits, persistent with hints of blackcurrant and wild berries and lightly spiced thyme and aromatic herbs. Rich and smooth, with good body and a well balanced and persistent finish. 30% of the wine is aged in barriques for 12 months and 70% for the same period in stainless steel.
Ideal with meat, game or seasoned cheeses.

100% Primitivo

The PietraPura range is a successful collaboration with famous winery group, Rocca delle Macìe which makes the most of the native vines of the Salento area to create wines that express the very best of the terroir. Rocca delle Macìe has combined experience and expertise to create three different types of wine using Primitivo and Negroamaro grapes. Mandus and Cotis, two expressions of Primitivo di Manduria DOC, Dolceluna – Primitivo Dolce Naturale DOCG- and Negramaro -Salento IGT- represent the high end of the range and are produced using grapes cultivated in vineyards selected by Rocca delle Macìe’s technicians. The grapes are then vinified and bottled in the Puglia Region, under the watchful eye of the Zingarelli family’s chief winemaker, Luca Francioni.

Rocca delle Macìe was established in 1973, when Italo Zingarelli – producer of Ettore Scola’s “We All Loved Each Other So Much”, and also of the wildly popular series of films featuring comedy duo Bud Spencer and Terence Hill (including “They Call Me Trinity” and “Trinity Is Still My Name”) – decided to realize his lifelong dream by acquiring the “Le Macìe” estate – extending across 93 hectares (230 acres) in all, of which only two were under vine – in order to create a winery in the heart of the Chianti Classico zone.

Rocca delle Macìe was established in 1973, when film producer Italo Zingarelli – of Ettore Scola’s “We All Loved Each Other So Much” fame, and also the wildly popular series of films featuring comedy duo Bud Spencer and Terence Hill (including “They Call Me Trinity” and “Trinity Is Still My Name”) – decided to realize his lifelong dream by acquiring the “Le Macìe” estate – extending across 93 hectares (230 acres) in all, of which only two were under vine – in order to create a winery in the heart of the Chianti Classico zone.

Puglia, also known as Apulia, is a long, narrow region comprising the heel of southern Italy's boot. Puglia is a major producer of both wine grapes and table grapes. Its name comes from a-pulvia, or “lack of rain” in Roman. The terroir is influenced by a sunny, warm Mediterranean climate with breezes from the Adriatic sea and fertile soil rich in limestone. The Puglian wine region is divided into three subregions: Foggia in the north, Bari and Taranto in the center, and Brindisi and Lecce in the south.

After Veneto, Puglia is tied with Sicily as the second biggest wine region in Italy. The Puglia area is mostly home to grape growers, rather than wine producers. However, there are winemakers producing quality wines in Puglia in smaller quantities. In addition to grapes, Puglia produces 40 percent of Italy's olive oil.

The grape of most interest to non-Italians is the early-ripening Primitivo, a speciality of the Gioia del Colle plain just south of Bari and Manduria, the western coast of the heel just south of Taranto. DNA analysis has proved what many had suspected all along, that this vine variety is one and the same as California's Zinfandel.

Primitivo is a dark-skinned grape known for producing inky, tannic wines, particularly Primitivo di Manduria and its naturally sweet Dolce Naturale variant. Although there have been contentious and long-running debates about the variety's geographical origins, there is little question that Primitivo's modern-day home is in southern Italy, particularly Puglia.