Rocca delle Macie Vernaiolo Chianti - Tuscany, Italy
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Rocca delle Macie Vernaiolo Chianti - Tuscany, Italy
Rocca delle Macie Vernaiolo Chianti - Tuscany, Italy
Rocca delle Macie Vernaiolo Chianti - Tuscany, Italy
google
Rocca delle Macie Vernaiolo Chianti - Tuscany, Italy
Rocca delle Macie Vernaiolo Chianti - Tuscany, Italy

Rocca delle Macie Vernaiolo Chianti 2021 - Tuscany, Italy

$34 $45
Quantity

This is Great……and Here’s Why!

90/100 James Suckling
90/100 James Suckling (2019)
91/100 James Suckling (2017)
90/100 James Suckling (2016)
91/100 James Suckling (2015)

Silver - Mundus Vini (2019)
1 Bicchiere - Vini d'Italia 2011 Gambero Rosso (2009)
Tre Grappoli - Duemilavini 2011 Associazione Italiana Sommelier (2009)


Organic - currently undergoing certification

James Suckling "Sweet-blackberry and orange-peel aromas with a medium to light body, fine tannins and a fresh finish."

James Suckling "Sweet cherries, minerals and some citrus on the nose and palate. Light body with no tannin impact and a delicious, creamy finish." (2019 vintage)

James Suckling "This is rich and delicious with black cherries and hints of milk chocolate. Medium body, light tannins and a crisp finish." (2017 vintage)

James Suckling "A fruity red with lots of dried berries and hints of dried flowers. Medium body, round tannins and a medium finish. Delicious and fun." (2016 vintage)

James Suckling "Bright aromas of cherries with underbrush and hints of terracotta. Sharp and linear with delicate fruit throughout. Clean finish. Light and easy." (2015 vintage)

Rocca delle Macìe was established in 1973, when film producer Italo Zingarelli – of Ettore Scola’s “We All Loved Each Other So Much” fame, and also the wildly popular series of films featuring comedy duo Bud Spencer and Terence Hill (including “They Call Me Trinity” and “Trinity Is Still My Name”) – decided to realize his lifelong dream by acquiring the “Le Macìe” estate – extending across 93 hectares (230 acres) in all, of which only two were under vine – in order to create a winery in the heart of the Chianti Classico zone.

The estate now extends to more than 500 hectares (1250 acres) with, in total, more than 200 (500 acres) used as vineyards and 22 (54 acres) as olive groves, subdivided across the company’s six estates: Le Macìe, Sant’Alfonso, Fizzano e le Tavolelle in the Chianti Classico Area, in addition to the Campomaccione and Casa Maria estates in the Morellino di Scansano Area (Maremma).

The Chianti region in Italy's Tuscany wine growing region is split between Chianti and Chianti Classico. Accordingly, two separate DOCG designations apply to wines from the Chianti region: the Chianti Classico DOCG for the heartland of Chianti, and Chianti DOCG for all other Chianti regions. (In 1984, the Chianti region was promoted from DOC to DOCG - Italy’s highest classification - and in 1996, Chianti Classico - the historic heartland of the region - DOCG was created, which gave autonomy to that region. In the last 20 years, a consortium of Chianti Classico producers have researched new Sangiovese clones, replanted vineyards, updated cellar practices and generally made Chianti Classico DOCG a world-class appellation. Chianti Classico must contain a minimum of 75% Sangiovese. In the 2014 edition of its annual compendium of wine ratings, Gambero Rosso noted that Chianti Classico DOCG wines were noteworthy for their “significant return to a more defined style, true to tradition.” The typical Chianti Classico wine is a ruby-red, Sangiovese-based wine with aromas of violets and cherries and a hint of earthy spice.

The Chianti DOCG designation covers wines from six Chianti sub-zones (Colli Pisane, Colli Fiorentini, Colli Senesi, Colli Aretini, Montalbano and Rufina) as well as all other Chianti wines. The Chianti Classico DOCG is located in the very center of Tuscany, between Florence and Sienna.

Sangiovese (or Nielluccio in Corsica), a dark-berried vine, is the most widely planted grape variety in Italy. Virtually synonymous with the red wines of Tuscany, and all the romanticism that goes with the territory, Sangiovese is the core constituent in some of the great names in Italian wine. Italy's love affair with Sangiovese – and indeed the world's – is generations old, though recent grapevine research suggests the variety is not as ancient as once thought.

90/100 James Suckling
90/100 James Suckling (2019)
91/100 James Suckling (2017)
90/100 James Suckling (2016)
91/100 James Suckling (2015)

Silver - Mundus Vini (2019)
1 Bicchiere - Vini d'Italia 2011 Gambero Rosso (2009)
Tre Grappoli - Duemilavini 2011 Associazione Italiana Sommelier (2009)


Organic - currently undergoing certification

James Suckling "Sweet-blackberry and orange-peel aromas with a medium to light body, fine tannins and a fresh finish."

James Suckling "Sweet cherries, minerals and some citrus on the nose and palate. Light body with no tannin impact and a delicious, creamy finish." (2019 vintage)

James Suckling "This is rich and delicious with black cherries and hints of milk chocolate. Medium body, light tannins and a crisp finish." (2017 vintage)

James Suckling "A fruity red with lots of dried berries and hints of dried flowers. Medium body, round tannins and a medium finish. Delicious and fun." (2016 vintage)

James Suckling "Bright aromas of cherries with underbrush and hints of terracotta. Sharp and linear with delicate fruit throughout. Clean finish. Light and easy." (2015 vintage)

Rocca delle Macìe was established in 1973, when film producer Italo Zingarelli – of Ettore Scola’s “We All Loved Each Other So Much” fame, and also the wildly popular series of films featuring comedy duo Bud Spencer and Terence Hill (including “They Call Me Trinity” and “Trinity Is Still My Name”) – decided to realize his lifelong dream by acquiring the “Le Macìe” estate – extending across 93 hectares (230 acres) in all, of which only two were under vine – in order to create a winery in the heart of the Chianti Classico zone.

The estate now extends to more than 500 hectares (1250 acres) with, in total, more than 200 (500 acres) used as vineyards and 22 (54 acres) as olive groves, subdivided across the company’s six estates: Le Macìe, Sant’Alfonso, Fizzano e le Tavolelle in the Chianti Classico Area, in addition to the Campomaccione and Casa Maria estates in the Morellino di Scansano Area (Maremma).

The Chianti region in Italy's Tuscany wine growing region is split between Chianti and Chianti Classico. Accordingly, two separate DOCG designations apply to wines from the Chianti region: the Chianti Classico DOCG for the heartland of Chianti, and Chianti DOCG for all other Chianti regions. (In 1984, the Chianti region was promoted from DOC to DOCG - Italy’s highest classification - and in 1996, Chianti Classico - the historic heartland of the region - DOCG was created, which gave autonomy to that region. In the last 20 years, a consortium of Chianti Classico producers have researched new Sangiovese clones, replanted vineyards, updated cellar practices and generally made Chianti Classico DOCG a world-class appellation. Chianti Classico must contain a minimum of 75% Sangiovese. In the 2014 edition of its annual compendium of wine ratings, Gambero Rosso noted that Chianti Classico DOCG wines were noteworthy for their “significant return to a more defined style, true to tradition.” The typical Chianti Classico wine is a ruby-red, Sangiovese-based wine with aromas of violets and cherries and a hint of earthy spice.

The Chianti DOCG designation covers wines from six Chianti sub-zones (Colli Pisane, Colli Fiorentini, Colli Senesi, Colli Aretini, Montalbano and Rufina) as well as all other Chianti wines. The Chianti Classico DOCG is located in the very center of Tuscany, between Florence and Sienna.

Sangiovese (or Nielluccio in Corsica), a dark-berried vine, is the most widely planted grape variety in Italy. Virtually synonymous with the red wines of Tuscany, and all the romanticism that goes with the territory, Sangiovese is the core constituent in some of the great names in Italian wine. Italy's love affair with Sangiovese – and indeed the world's – is generations old, though recent grapevine research suggests the variety is not as ancient as once thought.