Georges Duboeuf Vire Clesse 2019 - France

Georges Duboeuf Vire Clesse 2019 - France

$52   $67




This is great……and here’s why!

Award Winning Winery

Les Vins Georges Duboeuf is one of the largest wine producers in France founded by the late Georges Duboeuf who was affectionately known as 'le roi du Beaujolais' (the king of Beaujolais) or sometimes pape du Beaujolais (Pope of Beaujolais). Les Vins Georges Duboeuf produces a staggering 3 million cases of wine annually. The company is most well-known for its popularization and production of Beaujolais wines. In 2018 Georges’ passed control of his company to his son Franck Duboeuf, who is considered to be one of the key specialists in Beaujolais, its terroir and its wine, and has shifted production to focus more on Beaujolais Nouveau.

Viré-Clessé is an Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC) for white wine in the Mâconnais subregion in Burgundy in central France, located in the communes of Clessé, Laizé, Montbellet and Viré. The appellation VIRÉ-CLESSÉ achieved recognition in 1998 and was launched a year later. It is the first appellation Village to be formed from outstanding terroirs within the AOC Mâcon Villages. Viré and Clessé are two communes in southern Bourgogne lying between Tournus and Mâcon. Because the wines of the two villages closely resemble each other in typicity, it was decided to form them into a single appellation, although the terroirs included in it were subjected to a rigorous selection process. Viré and Clessé also produce wines of the appellations Mâcon, Bourgogne and Mâcon Villages. The names Mâcon-Viré and Mâcon-Clessé have been in disuse since 2002. The appellation consists of two hill-slopes running North-South between the valleys of the Bourbonne and the Mouge. The rocks are fossiliferous Bajocien limestones and Jurassic (Oxfordian) strata of marly-limestone. Other soils at the foot of the slopes are clays containing sandstone pebbles known as «chailles».
They are well-drained and East-facing. Also found here are soils containingwhite limestone pebbles typical of the Mâconnais and known as « cray «. It is the best soil for the Chardonnay grape. Altitudes: 200-440 meters.

Burgundy (Bourgogne in French) is an historic and highly respected wine region in eastern France. Burgundy wines have long had devout followers throughout the world and continue to do so today. Although Bordeaux produces about four times as much wine every year, Burgundy’s estimated 74,000 acres (30,000ha) of vineyards are considered to be of equal importance, producing some of the most exclusive wines on Earth.

The two key grape varieties of Burgundy are Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, both members of the extended 'Pinot' family of grape varieties. There are others too, of course, like Aligoté, Pinot Gris, Gamay, and Sauvignon Blanc but the primary focus of Burgundy’s production is Pinot Noir for Bourgogne Rouge and Chardonnay for Bourgogne Blanc. Located in the east-central part of France, Burgundy has 5 primary wine growing areas; Chablis – “shab-lee” Côte de Nuits – the night slope, Côte de Beaune – the slope of Beaune, Côte Chalonnaise – the Chalon slope, Mâconnais – the region of Mâcon.

Chardonnay is one of the world’s most popular grapes, Chardonnay is made in a wide range of styles from lean, to rich, creamy white wines aged in oak. Bolder, richer, full-bodied and buttery Chardonnays are made using oak and are produced in California, Burgundy, and Australia. Unoaked chardonnays such as Chablis and those produced in Chile, New Zealand, and other parts of France are leaner and often crisp and mineraly, with delicate flavors. By law, if a label says “Chablis,” it must be Chardonnay.

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