Sergio Zingarelli Chianti Classico Gran Selezione - Tuscany, Italy
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Sergio Zingarelli Chianti Classico Gran Selezione - Tuscany, Italy
Sergio Zingarelli Chianti Classico Gran Selezione - Tuscany, Italy
google
Sergio Zingarelli Chianti Classico Gran Selezione - Tuscany, Italy

Sergio Zingarelli Chianti Classico Gran Selezione 2016 - Tuscany, Italy

$150 $186
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This is Great……and Here’s Why!

95/100 James Suckling
93/100 Falstaff
93/100 Robert Parket, Wine Advocate
93/100 Raffaela Vecchione, Wine Critic
93/100 5 Stars Wine - The Book - Vinitily
92/100 Wine Spectator
17/20 Jancis Robinson
94/100 James Suckling (2015 vintage)
94/100 Raffaela Vecchione, Wine Critic (2015 vintage)
94/100 Wine Spectator (2015 vintage)
92/100 Robert Parket, Wine Advocate (2015 vintage)
92/100 Falstaff (2015 vintage)
91/100 Wine Enthusiast (2015 vintage)
91/100 CellarTracker (2015 vintage)
17/20 Jancis Robinson (2015 vintage)

Silver - The Global Master
Silver - International Wine & Spirit Competition
Bronze - Decanter World Wine Awards
Silver - Decanter World Wine Awards (2015 vintage)

James Suckling "Lovely sweet fruit with plums and cherries, as well as some walnut and smoke character. Fine, polished tannins. It’s medium-to full-bodied with firm, creamy tannins and a fruity finish. Delicious."

Falstaff "Dark, elegantly radiant ruby. Opens on the nose with notes of black tea, incense, sage, then a little smoke, ripe cherry, wild berry. On the palate dense, taut, very textured, opens with many layers and finely-meshed tannin, warm and precise fruit, lots of energy on the finish."

Robert Parket, Wine Advocate "The Rocca delle Macìe 2016 Chianti Classico Gran Selezione Sergio Zingarelli is the top-tier wine in this estate's portfolio. A dark and nicely concentrated expression, it shows lots of dark fruit and plum. Despite the pedigree of the vintage, however, this Gran Selezione remains easy and one-dimensional compared to some of its peers from this fortunate growing region of Castellina in Chianti."

James Suckling "Very ripe and rich red with dried-berry, plum, mushroom and bark character on the nose and palate. Fully body. Velvety texture." (2015 vintage)

Raffaela Vecchione, Wine Critic "Potent and assertive on the nose, displaying dark notes of marasca cherry, dark chocolate, and cassis. Full-bodied, with soft and velvety tannins and an energetic, well-gripped finish. A standout at Casa Rocca delle Macie." (2015 vintage)

Robert Parket, Wine Advocate "This is the top-shelf wine from Sergio Zingarelli. His namesake 2015 Chianti Classico Gran Selezione Sergio Zingarelli (100% Sangiovese) shows rich concentration and a seamless delivery of aromas that spans from black cherry and plum to spice and moist pipe tobacco. The fruit here is soft and luscious, but the mouthfeel is medium in length. It would turn a platter of modest carne asada soft tacos into an important dinner. " (2015 vintage)

Falstaff "Dunkle Schokolade, cocoa bean, and herbal bitterness. Soft on the palate, initially somewhat powdery, gradually increasing in grainy tannin, a palate structure that already shows initial signs of rounding, to which the impression of a pronounced mild acidity also contributes. A wine that defines itself through its forcefulness." (2015 vintage)

Wine Enthusiast "Underbrush, French oak, leather and camphor aromas waft out of the glass alongside a hint of violet. The full-bodied palate features dried black cherry, coconut, licorice and espresso alongside firm, close-grained tannins."

Rocca delle Macìe was established in 1973, when film producer Italo Zingarelli – of Ettore Scola’s “We All Loved Each Other So Much” fame, and also the wildly popular series of films featuring comedy duo Bud Spencer and Terence Hill (including “They Call Me Trinity” and “Trinity Is Still My Name”) – decided to realize his lifelong dream by acquiring the “Le Macìe” estate – extending across 93 hectares (230 acres) in all, of which only two were under vine – in order to create a winery in the heart of the Chianti Classico zone.

The estate now extends to more than 500 hectares (1250 acres) with, in total, more than 200 (500 acres) used as vineyards and 22 (54 acres) as olive groves, subdivided across the company’s six estates: Le Macìe, Sant’Alfonso, Fizzano e le Tavolelle in the Chianti Classico Area, in addition to the Campomaccione and Casa Maria estates in the Morellino di Scansano Area (Maremma).

The Chianti region in Italy's Tuscany wine growing region is split between Chianti and Chianti Classico. Accordingly, two separate DOCG designations apply to wines from the Chianti region: the Chianti Classico DOCG for the heartland of Chianti, and Chianti DOCG for all other Chianti regions. (In 1984, the Chianti region was promoted from DOC to DOCG - Italy’s highest classification - and in 1996, Chianti Classico - the historic heartland of the region - DOCG was created, which gave autonomy to that region. In the last 20 years, a consortium of Chianti Classico producers have researched new Sangiovese clones, replanted vineyards, updated cellar practices and generally made Chianti Classico DOCG a world-class appellation. Chianti Classico must contain a minimum of 75% Sangiovese. In the 2014 edition of its annual compendium of wine ratings, Gambero Rosso noted that Chianti Classico DOCG wines were noteworthy for their “significant return to a more defined style, true to tradition.” The typical Chianti Classico wine is a ruby-red, Sangiovese-based wine with aromas of violets and cherries and a hint of earthy spice.

The Chianti DOCG designation covers wines from six Chianti sub-zones (Colli Pisane, Colli Fiorentini, Colli Senesi, Colli Aretini, Montalbano and Rufina) as well as all other Chianti wines. The Chianti Classico DOCG is located in the very center of Tuscany, between Florence and Sienna."
"Tuscany is Italy's third most planted region (behind Sicily and Apulia) but it is eighth in terms of output, reflecting both the poor soil of Tuscany and deliberate efforts to limit yields and increase the quality in the wine. After Piedmont and the Veneto, Tuscany produces the third-highest volume of DOC/DOCG wines. More than 80% of the regions' production is in red wine, with the Sangiovese grape being Tuscany's' most prominent grape. Trebbiano is the leading white variety of the region.

The history of viticulture in Tuscany dates back to the Etruscans in the 8th century BC. From the fall of the Roman Empire and throughout the Middle Ages, monasteries were the main purveyors of wines in the region. As the aristocratic and merchant classes emerged, they inherited the share-cropping system of agriculture known as mezzadria. Many Tuscan landowners would turn their half of the grape harvest into wine that would be sold to merchants in Florence. Following the end of the Napoleonic Wars, Tuscany returned to the rule of the Habsburgs. Chianti, Chianti Classico, Brunello di Montalcino, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano and Super Tuscan are Tuscany’s best known wines.

Sangiovese (or Nielluccio in Corsica), a dark-berried vine, is the most widely planted grape variety in Italy. Virtually synonymous with the red wines of Tuscany, and all the romanticism that goes with the territory, Sangiovese is the core constituent in some of the great names in Italian wine. Italy's love affair with Sangiovese – and indeed the world's – is generations old, though recent grapevine research suggests the variety is not as ancient as once thought.

Cabernet Sauvignon is one of the most famous red wine grape variety on Earth. It is rivaled in this regard only by its Bordeaux stablemate Merlot, and its opposite number in Burgundy, Pinot Noir. From its origins in Bordeaux, Cabernet has successfully spread to almost every winegrowing country in the world. It is now the key grape variety in many first-rate New World wine regions, most notably Napa Valley, Coonawarra and Maipo Valley. Wherever they come from, Cabernet Sauvignon wines always seem to demonstrate a handful of common character traits: deep color, good tannin structure, moderate acidity and aromas of blackcurrant, tomato leaf, dark spices and cedarwood.Rocca delle Macìe was established in 1973, when film producer Italo Zingarelli – of Ettore Scola’s “We All Loved Each Other So Much” fame, and also the wildly popular series of films featuring comedy duo Bud Spencer and Terence Hill (including “They Call Me Trinity” and “Trinity Is Still My Name”) – decided to realize his lifelong dream by acquiring the “Le Macìe” estate – extending across 93 hectares (230 acres) in all, of which only two were under vine – in order to create a winery in the heart of the Chianti Classico zone.

The estate now extends to more than 500 hectares (1250 acres) with, in total, more than 200 (500 acres) used as vineyards and 22 (54 acres) as olive groves, subdivided across the company’s six estates: Le Macìe, Sant’Alfonso, Fizzano e le Tavolelle in the Chianti Classico Area, in addition to the Campomaccione and Casa Maria estates in the Morellino di Scansano Area (Maremma).

The Chianti region in Italy's Tuscany wine growing region is split between Chianti and Chianti Classico. Accordingly, two separate DOCG designations apply to wines from the Chianti region: the Chianti Classico DOCG for the heartland of Chianti, and Chianti DOCG for all other Chianti regions. (In 1984, the Chianti region was promoted from DOC to DOCG - Italy’s highest classification - and in 1996, Chianti Classico - the historic heartland of the region - DOCG was created, which gave autonomy to that region. In the last 20 years, a consortium of Chianti Classico producers have researched new Sangiovese clones, replanted vineyards, updated cellar practices and generally made Chianti Classico DOCG a world-class appellation. Chianti Classico must contain a minimum of 75% Sangiovese. In the 2014 edition of its annual compendium of wine ratings, Gambero Rosso noted that Chianti Classico DOCG wines were noteworthy for their “significant return to a more defined style, true to tradition.” The typical Chianti Classico wine is a ruby-red, Sangiovese-based wine with aromas of violets and cherries and a hint of earthy spice.

The Chianti DOCG designation covers wines from six Chianti sub-zones (Colli Pisane, Colli Fiorentini, Colli Senesi, Colli Aretini, Montalbano and Rufina) as well as all other Chianti wines. The Chianti Classico DOCG is located in the very center of Tuscany, between Florence and Sienna."
"Tuscany is Italy's third most planted region (behind Sicily and Apulia) but it is eighth in terms of output, reflecting both the poor soil of Tuscany and deliberate efforts to limit yields and increase the quality in the wine. After Piedmont and the Veneto, Tuscany produces the third-highest volume of DOC/DOCG wines. More than 80% of the regions' production is in red wine, with the Sangiovese grape being Tuscany's' most prominent grape. Trebbiano is the leading white variety of the region.

The history of viticulture in Tuscany dates back to the Etruscans in the 8th century BC. From the fall of the Roman Empire and throughout the Middle Ages, monasteries were the main purveyors of wines in the region. As the aristocratic and merchant classes emerged, they inherited the share-cropping system of agriculture known as mezzadria. Many Tuscan landowners would turn their half of the grape harvest into wine that would be sold to merchants in Florence. Following the end of the Napoleonic Wars, Tuscany returned to the rule of the Habsburgs. Chianti, Chianti Classico, Brunello di Montalcino, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano and Super Tuscan are Tuscany’s best known wines.

95/100 James Suckling
93/100 Falstaff
93/100 Robert Parket, Wine Advocate
93/100 Raffaela Vecchione, Wine Critic
93/100 5 Stars Wine - The Book - Vinitily
92/100 Wine Spectator
17/20 Jancis Robinson
94/100 James Suckling (2015 vintage)
94/100 Raffaela Vecchione, Wine Critic (2015 vintage)
94/100 Wine Spectator (2015 vintage)
92/100 Robert Parket, Wine Advocate (2015 vintage)
92/100 Falstaff (2015 vintage)
91/100 Wine Enthusiast (2015 vintage)
91/100 CellarTracker (2015 vintage)
17/20 Jancis Robinson (2015 vintage)

Silver - The Global Master
Silver - International Wine & Spirit Competition
Bronze - Decanter World Wine Awards
Silver - Decanter World Wine Awards (2015 vintage)

James Suckling "Lovely sweet fruit with plums and cherries, as well as some walnut and smoke character. Fine, polished tannins. It’s medium-to full-bodied with firm, creamy tannins and a fruity finish. Delicious."

Falstaff "Dark, elegantly radiant ruby. Opens on the nose with notes of black tea, incense, sage, then a little smoke, ripe cherry, wild berry. On the palate dense, taut, very textured, opens with many layers and finely-meshed tannin, warm and precise fruit, lots of energy on the finish."

Robert Parket, Wine Advocate "The Rocca delle Macìe 2016 Chianti Classico Gran Selezione Sergio Zingarelli is the top-tier wine in this estate's portfolio. A dark and nicely concentrated expression, it shows lots of dark fruit and plum. Despite the pedigree of the vintage, however, this Gran Selezione remains easy and one-dimensional compared to some of its peers from this fortunate growing region of Castellina in Chianti."

James Suckling "Very ripe and rich red with dried-berry, plum, mushroom and bark character on the nose and palate. Fully body. Velvety texture." (2015 vintage)

Raffaela Vecchione, Wine Critic "Potent and assertive on the nose, displaying dark notes of marasca cherry, dark chocolate, and cassis. Full-bodied, with soft and velvety tannins and an energetic, well-gripped finish. A standout at Casa Rocca delle Macie." (2015 vintage)

Robert Parket, Wine Advocate "This is the top-shelf wine from Sergio Zingarelli. His namesake 2015 Chianti Classico Gran Selezione Sergio Zingarelli (100% Sangiovese) shows rich concentration and a seamless delivery of aromas that spans from black cherry and plum to spice and moist pipe tobacco. The fruit here is soft and luscious, but the mouthfeel is medium in length. It would turn a platter of modest carne asada soft tacos into an important dinner. " (2015 vintage)

Falstaff "Dunkle Schokolade, cocoa bean, and herbal bitterness. Soft on the palate, initially somewhat powdery, gradually increasing in grainy tannin, a palate structure that already shows initial signs of rounding, to which the impression of a pronounced mild acidity also contributes. A wine that defines itself through its forcefulness." (2015 vintage)

Wine Enthusiast "Underbrush, French oak, leather and camphor aromas waft out of the glass alongside a hint of violet. The full-bodied palate features dried black cherry, coconut, licorice and espresso alongside firm, close-grained tannins."

Rocca delle Macìe was established in 1973, when film producer Italo Zingarelli – of Ettore Scola’s “We All Loved Each Other So Much” fame, and also the wildly popular series of films featuring comedy duo Bud Spencer and Terence Hill (including “They Call Me Trinity” and “Trinity Is Still My Name”) – decided to realize his lifelong dream by acquiring the “Le Macìe” estate – extending across 93 hectares (230 acres) in all, of which only two were under vine – in order to create a winery in the heart of the Chianti Classico zone.

The estate now extends to more than 500 hectares (1250 acres) with, in total, more than 200 (500 acres) used as vineyards and 22 (54 acres) as olive groves, subdivided across the company’s six estates: Le Macìe, Sant’Alfonso, Fizzano e le Tavolelle in the Chianti Classico Area, in addition to the Campomaccione and Casa Maria estates in the Morellino di Scansano Area (Maremma).

The Chianti region in Italy's Tuscany wine growing region is split between Chianti and Chianti Classico. Accordingly, two separate DOCG designations apply to wines from the Chianti region: the Chianti Classico DOCG for the heartland of Chianti, and Chianti DOCG for all other Chianti regions. (In 1984, the Chianti region was promoted from DOC to DOCG - Italy’s highest classification - and in 1996, Chianti Classico - the historic heartland of the region - DOCG was created, which gave autonomy to that region. In the last 20 years, a consortium of Chianti Classico producers have researched new Sangiovese clones, replanted vineyards, updated cellar practices and generally made Chianti Classico DOCG a world-class appellation. Chianti Classico must contain a minimum of 75% Sangiovese. In the 2014 edition of its annual compendium of wine ratings, Gambero Rosso noted that Chianti Classico DOCG wines were noteworthy for their “significant return to a more defined style, true to tradition.” The typical Chianti Classico wine is a ruby-red, Sangiovese-based wine with aromas of violets and cherries and a hint of earthy spice.

The Chianti DOCG designation covers wines from six Chianti sub-zones (Colli Pisane, Colli Fiorentini, Colli Senesi, Colli Aretini, Montalbano and Rufina) as well as all other Chianti wines. The Chianti Classico DOCG is located in the very center of Tuscany, between Florence and Sienna."
"Tuscany is Italy's third most planted region (behind Sicily and Apulia) but it is eighth in terms of output, reflecting both the poor soil of Tuscany and deliberate efforts to limit yields and increase the quality in the wine. After Piedmont and the Veneto, Tuscany produces the third-highest volume of DOC/DOCG wines. More than 80% of the regions' production is in red wine, with the Sangiovese grape being Tuscany's' most prominent grape. Trebbiano is the leading white variety of the region.

The history of viticulture in Tuscany dates back to the Etruscans in the 8th century BC. From the fall of the Roman Empire and throughout the Middle Ages, monasteries were the main purveyors of wines in the region. As the aristocratic and merchant classes emerged, they inherited the share-cropping system of agriculture known as mezzadria. Many Tuscan landowners would turn their half of the grape harvest into wine that would be sold to merchants in Florence. Following the end of the Napoleonic Wars, Tuscany returned to the rule of the Habsburgs. Chianti, Chianti Classico, Brunello di Montalcino, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano and Super Tuscan are Tuscany’s best known wines.

Sangiovese (or Nielluccio in Corsica), a dark-berried vine, is the most widely planted grape variety in Italy. Virtually synonymous with the red wines of Tuscany, and all the romanticism that goes with the territory, Sangiovese is the core constituent in some of the great names in Italian wine. Italy's love affair with Sangiovese – and indeed the world's – is generations old, though recent grapevine research suggests the variety is not as ancient as once thought.

Cabernet Sauvignon is one of the most famous red wine grape variety on Earth. It is rivaled in this regard only by its Bordeaux stablemate Merlot, and its opposite number in Burgundy, Pinot Noir. From its origins in Bordeaux, Cabernet has successfully spread to almost every winegrowing country in the world. It is now the key grape variety in many first-rate New World wine regions, most notably Napa Valley, Coonawarra and Maipo Valley. Wherever they come from, Cabernet Sauvignon wines always seem to demonstrate a handful of common character traits: deep color, good tannin structure, moderate acidity and aromas of blackcurrant, tomato leaf, dark spices and cedarwood.Rocca delle Macìe was established in 1973, when film producer Italo Zingarelli – of Ettore Scola’s “We All Loved Each Other So Much” fame, and also the wildly popular series of films featuring comedy duo Bud Spencer and Terence Hill (including “They Call Me Trinity” and “Trinity Is Still My Name”) – decided to realize his lifelong dream by acquiring the “Le Macìe” estate – extending across 93 hectares (230 acres) in all, of which only two were under vine – in order to create a winery in the heart of the Chianti Classico zone.

The estate now extends to more than 500 hectares (1250 acres) with, in total, more than 200 (500 acres) used as vineyards and 22 (54 acres) as olive groves, subdivided across the company’s six estates: Le Macìe, Sant’Alfonso, Fizzano e le Tavolelle in the Chianti Classico Area, in addition to the Campomaccione and Casa Maria estates in the Morellino di Scansano Area (Maremma).

The Chianti region in Italy's Tuscany wine growing region is split between Chianti and Chianti Classico. Accordingly, two separate DOCG designations apply to wines from the Chianti region: the Chianti Classico DOCG for the heartland of Chianti, and Chianti DOCG for all other Chianti regions. (In 1984, the Chianti region was promoted from DOC to DOCG - Italy’s highest classification - and in 1996, Chianti Classico - the historic heartland of the region - DOCG was created, which gave autonomy to that region. In the last 20 years, a consortium of Chianti Classico producers have researched new Sangiovese clones, replanted vineyards, updated cellar practices and generally made Chianti Classico DOCG a world-class appellation. Chianti Classico must contain a minimum of 75% Sangiovese. In the 2014 edition of its annual compendium of wine ratings, Gambero Rosso noted that Chianti Classico DOCG wines were noteworthy for their “significant return to a more defined style, true to tradition.” The typical Chianti Classico wine is a ruby-red, Sangiovese-based wine with aromas of violets and cherries and a hint of earthy spice.

The Chianti DOCG designation covers wines from six Chianti sub-zones (Colli Pisane, Colli Fiorentini, Colli Senesi, Colli Aretini, Montalbano and Rufina) as well as all other Chianti wines. The Chianti Classico DOCG is located in the very center of Tuscany, between Florence and Sienna."
"Tuscany is Italy's third most planted region (behind Sicily and Apulia) but it is eighth in terms of output, reflecting both the poor soil of Tuscany and deliberate efforts to limit yields and increase the quality in the wine. After Piedmont and the Veneto, Tuscany produces the third-highest volume of DOC/DOCG wines. More than 80% of the regions' production is in red wine, with the Sangiovese grape being Tuscany's' most prominent grape. Trebbiano is the leading white variety of the region.

The history of viticulture in Tuscany dates back to the Etruscans in the 8th century BC. From the fall of the Roman Empire and throughout the Middle Ages, monasteries were the main purveyors of wines in the region. As the aristocratic and merchant classes emerged, they inherited the share-cropping system of agriculture known as mezzadria. Many Tuscan landowners would turn their half of the grape harvest into wine that would be sold to merchants in Florence. Following the end of the Napoleonic Wars, Tuscany returned to the rule of the Habsburgs. Chianti, Chianti Classico, Brunello di Montalcino, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano and Super Tuscan are Tuscany’s best known wines.